Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Votes - 5 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
James/Pub Med disagree
Author Message
JC73 Offline
Member
***

Posts: 52
Joined: Jun 2012
Reputation: 0
Post: #1
James/Pub Med disagree
According to a number of Pub Med research articles an alkaline diet of fruits and vegetables is beneficial.An alkaline diet can be measured by urine pH according to Pub Med.

James,What do you make of this information which appears to be in conflict with your stance on an alkaline diet.

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1335-43. Epub 2007 Nov 28.

Urine pH is an indicator of dietary acid-base load, fruit and vegetables and meat intakes: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk population study.

Welch AA1, Mulligan A, Bingham SA, Khaw KT.


Author information




Abstract


Evidence exists that a more acidic diet is detrimental to bone health. Although more precise methods exist for measurement of acid-base balance, urine pH reflects acid-base balance and is readily measurable but has not been related to habitual dietary intake in general populations. The present study investigated the relationship between urine pH and dietary acid-base load (potential renal acid load; PRAL) and its contributory food groups (fruit and vegetables, meats, cereal and dairy foods). There were 22,034 men and women aged 39-78 years living in Norfolk (UK) with casual urine samples and dietary intakes from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk FFQ. A sub-study (n 363) compared pH in casual samples and 24 h urine and intakes from a 7 d diary and the FFQ. A more alkaline diet (low PRAL), high fruit and vegetable intake and lower consumption of meat was significantly associated with a more alkaline urine pH before and after adjustment for age, BMI, physical activity and smoking habit and also after excluding for urinary protein, glucose, ketones, diagnosed high blood pressure and diuretic medication. In the sub-study the strongest relationship was found between the 24 h urine and the 7 d diary. In conclusion, a more alkaline diet, higher fruit and vegetable and lower meat intake were related to more alkaline urine with a magnitude similar to intervention studies. As urine pH relates to dietary acid-base load its use to monitor change in consumption of fruit and vegetables, in individuals, warrants further investigation.
04-16-2014 07:20 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
James Offline
Administrator
*******

Posts: 2,827
Joined: Feb 2012
Reputation: 15
Post: #2
RE: James/Pub Med disagree
(04-16-2014 07:20 AM)JC73 Wrote:  According to a number of Pub Med research articles an alkaline diet of fruits and vegetables is beneficial.An alkaline diet can be measured by urine pH according to Pub Med.

James,What do you make of this information which appears to be in conflict with your stance on an alkaline diet.

Br J Nutr. 2008 Jun;99(6):1335-43. Epub 2007 Nov 28.

Urine pH is an indicator of dietary acid-base load, fruit and vegetables and meat intakes: results from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk population study.

Welch AA1, Mulligan A, Bingham SA, Khaw KT.


Author information




Abstract


Evidence exists that a more acidic diet is detrimental to bone health. Although more precise methods exist for measurement of acid-base balance, urine pH reflects acid-base balance and is readily measurable but has not been related to habitual dietary intake in general populations. The present study investigated the relationship between urine pH and dietary acid-base load (potential renal acid load; PRAL) and its contributory food groups (fruit and vegetables, meats, cereal and dairy foods). There were 22,034 men and women aged 39-78 years living in Norfolk (UK) with casual urine samples and dietary intakes from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Norfolk FFQ. A sub-study (n 363) compared pH in casual samples and 24 h urine and intakes from a 7 d diary and the FFQ. A more alkaline diet (low PRAL), high fruit and vegetable intake and lower consumption of meat was significantly associated with a more alkaline urine pH before and after adjustment for age, BMI, physical activity and smoking habit and also after excluding for urinary protein, glucose, ketones, diagnosed high blood pressure and diuretic medication. In the sub-study the strongest relationship was found between the 24 h urine and the 7 d diary. In conclusion, a more alkaline diet, higher fruit and vegetable and lower meat intake were related to more alkaline urine with a magnitude similar to intervention studies. As urine pH relates to dietary acid-base load its use to monitor change in consumption of fruit and vegetables, in individuals, warrants further investigation.

One simple explanation for this is the fact that the body can overload with minerals if built up in excess. High serum calcium for example can cause high blood pressure, constipation, mental disturbances, loss of memory, muscle spasms/contractions, etc. So what happens when someone eats a lot of green loaded with minerals? The body cannot utilize all the minerals. Not even by deposition in bone since excess bone mineralization leads to increased risk of fracture from loss of bone flexibility to absorb forces. So the body needs to dump the excess minerals, which will be dumped through the urine altering urinary pH without any alteration of blood pH.

The opposite is true of dietary acids, which are also widely found in plants as well as meats. The body can utilize these acids to an extent and the rest will be dumped in the urine altering urinary pH without altering blood pH.

Why isn't blood pH altered? because diet has virtually no influence on blood pH.

The primary means of blood pH regulation is respiration. If the blood starts becoming too acidic respiration increases to reduce carbonic acid levels. If the blood becomes too alkaline respiration slows to restore proper carbonic acid levels in the blood. So the blood pH is maintained regardless of what other minerals or acids are floating around in the blood and therefore urinary pH does not reflect blood pH.

Urinary pH can also be affected by other factors such as urinary bacterial infections that make the urine alkaline, some medications, citrates from foods or supplements that also make the urine alkaline, etc. Again all independent of blood pH.

The retention or excretion of hydrogen ions by the kidneys is the secondary means of pH regulation by the body.

My friend Markus and I did a video on the alkaline myth:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7O6GhVCvVgE

Clearly we pissed off the alkaline water sales people because we got over a thousand dislikes just in the last few weeks.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
05-02-2014 02:08 AM
Find all posts by this user Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)