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Vitamin D and skin
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let's feel excellent Offline
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Vitamin D and skin
Hello James,

I know that you recommend washing skin with something acid such as ascorbic acid. I have tried this and like the results. I wonder about if this process removes the vitamin D off of my skin like soap does. I also wonder if applying oil, such as coconut oil to my skin will do the same thing.

I have had the experience of being out in the sun at the optimal times for collecting vitamin D. Even though I have been careful not to wash it off my skin, my blood tests show that I am low in vit. D.

Thank you, so much
01-22-2014 02:58 AM
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James Offline
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RE: Vitamin D and skin
(01-22-2014 02:58 AM)lets feel excellent Wrote:  Hello James,

I know that you recommend washing skin with something acid such as ascorbic acid. I have tried this and like the results. I wonder about if this process removes the vitamin D off of my skin like soap does. I also wonder if applying oil, such as coconut oil to my skin will do the same thing.

I have had the experience of being out in the sun at the optimal times for collecting vitamin D. Even though I have been careful not to wash it off my skin, my blood tests show that I am low in vit. D.

Thank you, so much

There is no real evidence that we absorb vitamin D through the skin. The vitamin D our bodies utilize comes from the inner layers of skin and thus cannot get washed off. This is just another one of those internet myths based on an old outdated and poorly done study. In this case the study was performed in 1937 and the results were never verified. I addressed this myth here:

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread....e=threaded

As for testing for vitamin D levels this test is not going to be accurate for the same reason tests for hormones such as estrogen and progesterone are highly inaccurate. They cannot test for levels of these substances stored in the tissues, only what is circulating.

Also keep in mind that there is not a single vitamin D. Actually there are over 20 forms of vitamin d. But we are only concerned with 3, which basically are inactive D2, inactive D3 and active D3. Even if they could accurately test for vitamin D levels they would still have to be able to differentiate between the different forms of vitamin D to make sure the person has adequate levels of active D3.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
02-17-2014 03:25 AM
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