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Acidosis myths
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James Offline
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Post: #1
Acidosis myths
The body RARELY ever goes acidic. The acidity causing disease claims is really a myth. The body cannot survive if it becomes too acidic, or too alkaline. In fact a pH higher than 7.8 or lower than 6.8 will kill a person. This is why the body has so many redundant systems to maintain its narrow pH it can survive in. For example, breathing adjusts pH. If the body starts to get acidic our respiration increases to blow off CO2, which reduces carbonic acid, and the oxygen reduces acidic lactate. If the body starts to become too alkaline the respiration slows down to retain CO2, increasing carbonic acid. The body also generates bicarbonate to deal with acidity, can excrete hydrogen ions, carbonic acid or bicarbonate out through the urine or retain them to adjust pH. The body also uses phosphates and hemoglobin as buffers and in extreme cases can pull minerals from the bones as a buffer against acidity. Our pH is also regulated by proteins that can either bond or release hydrogen ions in response to pH imbalances. Here are some references for you:

http://dwb4.unl.edu/Chem/CHEM869R/CHEM86...ntrol.html

http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu/~edudev/L...uffer.html

This is why we rarely see acidosis (overly acidic blood) or alkalosis (overly alkaline blood). Acute acidosis can occur with severe vomiting and diarrhea, ketoacidosis, inadequate oxygen intake or utilization (respiratory acidosis), rhabdomyolosis, kidney failure and by poisoning with certain chemicals. Acute alkalosis can occur with over consumption of hydroxides including alkaline waters, consumption of milk with hydroxides, overuse of carbonates such as antacids or baking soda, prolonged vomiting, excessive aldosterone secretion, diuretic use and hyperventilation.

The pH of the lymphatic system is kept slightly more alkaline than the blood, so lymphatic acidosis does not occur.

Because chronic acidosis is so rare and diseases are so common even common sense should tell us that acidosis is not a cause of most diseases. Most often it is a byproduct of a disease, not a cause. So anyone who is going to claim that acidity is the cause of most or all diseases does not have a clue what they are talking about.

In fact we need a large number of acids to survive and thrive. These include hydrochloric acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid, carbonic acid, hyaluronic acid, glucuronic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, uric acid, fatty acids, amino acids, ascorbic acid, pantothenic acid, folic acid, etc.

And most pathogens are killed by acids and thrive in an alkaline environment. This is why the parts of the body that help protect us from pathogens are normally acidic. These include the skin, stomach, intestines and sinuses.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
(This post was last modified: 09-14-2013 08:53 PM by James.)
09-14-2013 08:43 AM
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James Offline
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Post: #2
RE: Acidosis myths
(09-14-2013 11:27 AM)Robynmc Wrote:  
(09-14-2013 08:43 AM)James Wrote:  The body RARELY ever goes acidic. The acidity causing disease claims is really a myth. The body cannot survive if it becomes too acidic, or too alkaline. In fact a pH higher than 7.8 or lower than 6.8 will kill a person. This is why the body has so many redundant systems to maintain its narrow pH it can survive in. For example, breathing adjusts pH. If the body starts to get acidic our respiration increases to blow off CO2, which reduces carbonic acid, and the oxygen reduces acidic lactate. If the body starts to become too alkaline the respiration slows down to retain CO2, increasing carbonic acid. The body also generates bicarbonate to deal with acidity, can excrete hydrogen ions, carbonic acid or bicarbonate out through the urine or retain them to adjust pH. The body also uses phosphates and hemoglobin as buffers and in extreme cases can pull minerals from the bones as a buffer against acidity. Our pH is also regulated by proteins that can either bond or release hydrogen ions in response to pH imbalances. Here are some references for you:

http://dwb4.unl.edu/Chem/CHEM869R/CHEM86...ntrol.html

http://www.chemistry.wustl.edu/~edudev/L...uffer.html

This is why we rarely see acidosis (overly acidic blood) or alkalosis (overly alkaline blood). Acute acidosis can occur with severe vomiting and diarrhea, ketoacidosis, inadequate oxygen intake or utilization (respiratory acidosis), rhabdomyolosis, kidney failure and by poisoning with certain chemicals. Acute alkalosis can occur with over consumption of hydroxides including alkaline waters, consumption of milk with hydroxides, overuse of carbonates such as antacids or baking soda, prolonged vomiting, excessive aldosterone secretion, diuretic use and hyperventilation.

The pH of the lymphatic system is kept slightly more alkaline than the blood, so lymphatic acidosis does not occur.

Because chronic acidosis is so rare and diseases are so common even common sense should tell us that acidosis is not a cause of most diseases. Most often it is a byproduct of a disease, not a cause. So anyone who is going to claim that acidity is the cause of most or all diseases does not have a clue what they are talking about.

In fact we need a large number of acids to survive and thrive. These include hydrochloric acid, pyruvic acid, acetic acid, carbonic acid, hyaluronic acid, glucuronic acid, malic acid, lactic acid, citric acid, uric acid, fatty acids, amino acids, ascorbic acid, pantothenic acid, folic acid, etc.

And most pathogens are killed by acids and thrive in an alkaline environment. This is why the parts of the body that help protect us from pathogens are normally acidic. These include the skin, stomach, intestines and sinuses.

Hi James

just a heads up, both those links don't work.

Thanks for letting me know. I redid the links so they should work now.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
09-14-2013 08:54 PM
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Anderson Offline
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Post: #3
Lactic acid
In both links they claim our bodies produce lactic acid which I've seen you write many times our cells do not produce, only bacteria.

That makes me a little bit confused...
09-17-2013 09:22 AM
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James Offline
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Post: #4
RE: Lactic acid
(09-17-2013 09:22 AM)Anderson Wrote:  In both links they claim our bodies produce lactic acid which I've seen you write many times our cells do not produce, only bacteria.

That makes me a little bit confused...

More specifically NO human cells secrete lactic acid. For example, during heavy exercise the muscles generate non-acidic lactate, which can actually be used as fuel by the cells. The temporary acidity generated during heavy exercise was once believed to be from a build up of lactic acid. Today we know that is not the case. The temporary acidity is the result of acidic hydrogen ions (protons) generated during the exercise.

Unfortunately, there are several problems that lead to the repeated lactic acid myth.

One is that people are referencing outdated material. If you look at their reference from the first link the date is 1968, at which time it was still thought that the body generated lactic acid.

The second problem is that researchers often, and incorrectly, use lactic acid and lactate interchangeably. I have even seen research articles where this was done repeatedly within the same research article. Lactic acid and lactate though are not the same thing. Lactic acid as we can tell by the name is an acid. Lactate is the non-acidic salt of lactic acid.

The only cells within and on the body that secrete acid lactic acid are beneficial bacteria within parts of our body and on our skin referred to as flora.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
(This post was last modified: 09-27-2014 04:06 AM by James.)
09-18-2013 04:05 AM
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Anderson Offline
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Post: #5
RE: Acidosis myths
Thanks for the clarification!
09-18-2013 06:38 AM
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James Offline
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Post: #6
RE: Acidosis myths
Here is a study with more detail on what I was talking about. Note they properly claiming lactate and not lactic acid:

Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Jun;8(3):127-31.

Lactate production and clearance in exercise. Effects of training. A mini-review.

Stallknecht B, Vissing J, Galbo H.

Source

Department of Medical Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Abstract

Lactate accumulates if pyruvate formation exceeds pyruvate oxidation. Accelerated glycogenolysis is essential for lactate production. Glycogen and epinephrine enhance glycogen phosphorylase activity and this is higher in type II b than in type I fibers. Pyruvate oxidation is enhanced by exercise-induced increase in pyruvate dehydrogenase activity and is relatively impaired by low oxygen availability and low mitochondrial oxidative capacity. During exercise lactate is eliminated in liver, heart, and resting and working muscle. In muscle, elimination depends on plasma concentration, fiber type, and fiber conditions. Due to influence on hormonal response, mitochondrial oxidative capacity and fiber recruitment, training diminishes glycogenolysis and lactate production. Training also increases lactate clearance. This reflects increased hepatic capacity for gluconeogenesis as well as increased lactate transport capacity and oxidative capacity and reduced glycogenolysis in muscle. The fact that endurance performance can be predicted from the plasma lactate versus exercise intensity relationship illustrates that the plasma lactate level is a finely balanced result of the interplay between many factors of importance for endurance exercise.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
(This post was last modified: 09-18-2013 02:58 PM by James.)
09-18-2013 02:58 PM
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James Offline
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Post: #7
RE: Acidosis myths
Some other links with more detail:

http://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20f...ctate.html

http://runnersconnect.net/running-traini...ctic-acid/

http://www.mindthesciencegap.org/2013/06...-exercise/

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
09-18-2013 03:11 PM
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