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Candida diet
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James Offline
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Candida diet
To quote from a past post by you:

"An acidic environment not only turns off the Candida growth gene, but it also keeps the Candida in a non-pathogenic yeast form. In an alkaline environment the Candida's growth gene is turned on and the Candida converts to a highly aggressive and pathogenic fungal form. In this form the Candida produce little finger like projections called hyphae that allow the Candida to dig in to organs and tissues causing damage."

The bulk of my candida diet is low-carb veggies. A smaller part is protein and healthy fats and oils. The veggies are all on the alkaline food chart. How does one stay on a candida diet but support an acid intestinal environment?

Thank you

The answer is actually pretty simple and involves what is known as chelation. If someone ingests unchelated minerals they will definitely alter the pH in a bad way. For example calcium carbonate (oyster shell, dolomite, coral, etc.), calcium oxide/hydroxide (lime), and magnesium oxide all neutralize the acids in the stomach and intestines as soon as they contact it. The minerals in plants on the other hand are generally chelated. This basically means bound to amino acids. In this chelated form there is no strong neutralizing action of the stomach acid. Instead the minerals are disassociated and released in to the blood from the intestines.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
(This post was last modified: 08-17-2014 05:52 AM by James.)
06-26-2012 05:55 AM
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merlin Offline
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RE: Candida diet
Hi James,

I was just wondering if you know of any specific supplements that one could take to help acidify the small and large intestine aside from chelated minerals and probiotics, which I have taken in abundance. I have a longstanding candida infection and have also begun to subscribe to the notion that the originally acidic terrain must have been altered by the candida to an alkaline one.

One of the major symptoms I suffer from is chronic anal itching, and when I described this symptom to two separate gastroenterologists they thought that it must be caused by alkaline mucus coming into contact with the perianal skin which has an acidic pH. This to me adds credence to the idea that the candida has made my bowels alkaline and the waste products it produces are also alkaline. I have found that sauerkraut and apple cider vinegar have helped quite a lot.

I also found this article abstract from 1999 which further supports your research that the pH of a healthy GI tract is predominantly acidic.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10421978

Thanks.
07-25-2012 09:09 AM
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James Offline
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RE: Candida diet
(07-25-2012 09:09 AM)merlin Wrote:  Hi James,

I was just wondering if you know of any specific supplements that one could take to help acidify the small and large intestine aside from chelated minerals and probiotics, which I have taken in abundance. I have a longstanding candida infection and have also begun to subscribe to the notion that the originally acidic terrain must have been altered by the candida to an alkaline one.

One of the major symptoms I suffer from is chronic anal itching, and when I described this symptom to two separate gastroenterologists they thought that it must be caused by alkaline mucus coming into contact with the perianal skin which has an acidic pH.

Our skin in general needs a slightly acidic pH to be healthy. This is why most soaps are so damaging to the skin. Soaps tend to be very alkaline and therefore create an alkaline skin pH. This can dry the skin leading to damage and infection.

A few other causes of anal itching can be hemorrhoids, or if primarily at night it can be pinworms.


This to me adds credence to the idea that the candida has made my bowels alkaline and the waste products it produces are also alkaline. I have found that sauerkraut and apple cider vinegar have helped quite a lot.

I also found this article abstract from 1999 which further supports your research that the pH of a healthy GI tract is predominantly acidic.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10421978

Thanks.

As far as trying to create the slightly acidic pH required in the colon the only real way to do it is by increasing the amount of acid producing flora. Consuming acids will not do it. The reason is that everything entering the stomach is acidified, but then as the chyme exists the stomach the acid is neutralized by pancreatic bicarbonate. So the only way acids would be able to acidify the intestines is if the amount of acid exceeds the buffering capacity of the bicarbonate.

If you do not want to use probiotics then your other option, and the one I prefer anyway, would be prebiotic fibers. Some good choices include rice bran, oat bran, vegetable gums (xanthan, guar, konjac, etc.), inulin and fructooligosaccharides (FOS). The flora ferment these fibers to generate the beneficial acids as well as various other beneficial compounds like vitamins and bactericides.

http://www.MountainMistBotanicals.com
07-26-2012 11:36 PM
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