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Candida albicans Rim13p, a protease required for Rim101p processing at acidic and alk - Printable Version

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Candida albicans Rim13p, a protease required for Rim101p processing at acidic and alk - James - 09-22-2013 04:45 AM

Eukaryot Cell. 2004 Jun;3(3):741-51.

Candida albicans Rim13p, a protease required for Rim101p processing at acidic and alkaline pHs.

Li M, Martin SJ, Bruno VM, Mitchell AP, Davis DA.

Source

Department of Microbiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis MN 55455, USA.
Abstract

Candida albicans is an important commensal of mucosal surfaces that is also an opportunistic pathogen. This organism colonizes a wide range of host sites that differ in pH; thus, it must respond appropriately to this environmental stress to survive. The ability to respond to neutral-to-alkaline pHs is governed in part by the RIM101 signal transduction pathway. Here we describe the analysis of C. albicans Rim13p, a homolog of the Rim13p/PalB calpain-like protease member of the RIM101/pacC pathway from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans, respectively. RIM13, like other members of the RIM101 pathway, is required for alkaline pH-induced filamentation and growth under extreme alkaline conditions. Further, our studies suggest that the RIM101 pathway promotes pH-independent responses, including resistance to high concentrations of lithium and to the drug hygromycin B. RIM13 encodes a calpain-like protease, and we found that Rim101p undergoes a Rim13p-dependent C-terminal proteolytic processing event at neutral-to-alkaline pHs, similar to that reported for S. cerevisiae Rim101p and A. nidulans PacC. However, we present evidence that suggests that C. albicans Rim101p undergoes a novel processing event at acidic pHs that has not been reported in either S. cerevisiae or A. nidulans. Thus, our results provide a framework to understand how the C. albicans Rim101p processing pathway promotes alkaline pH-independent processes.

Copyright 2004 American Society for Microbiology

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