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Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - James - 09-14-2013 08:18 AM

Addressing the first article from an earlier post about distilled water (http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1537768#i

Or water distilled harms http://curezone.com/forums/fm.asp?i=1513531#i


The question of whether distilled water "leaches" minerals from the body causing hair-loss and other health problems due to mineral deficiencies.?
Distilled water was used for decades in even the most prolonged fasts with NO hair-loss or other health problems associated with mineral/electrolyte deficiencies.

This is not true. Just because something is not obvious without testing does not mean that health issues are not occurring. For example there is the electrolyte issue. Distilled water is hypotonic to the cells so it rapidly flows in to the cells. In fact if red blood cells are placed in distilled water they will quickly swell and burst from the influx of water. One of the biggest concerns of drinking distilled water is that the sudden influx of water in to the system due to the hypotonic state will disrupt the electrolyte balance. The greater the intake of water at one time the greater the risk of a severe imbalance.

Leaching of minerals from the bone or loss of vitamins due to drinking distilled water may not be obvious or obvious at first either.


"You may have heard that distilled water "leaches" minerals from the body. That is partially true. The minerals that are leached(removed) by distilled water are the inorganic minerals that the body cannot use. The effect, therefore, is healthful.

Again not true and very easy to prove wrong. As I have pointed out before in order for minerals to get in to the body they must first be dissolved in water. As the water moves in to the body it carries the dissolved minerals with it. This is true whether the minerals are bound to organic materials or not. And just as easily as the water dissolves the minerals to carry them in to the body the same water can dissolve these minerals to carry them out of the body. This is essential to the body as too much of any mineral can cause problems to the body. Just imagine what would happen to the body if we retained all the "organic" calcium we ever ingested throughout our life. Luckily water removes these excess "organic" minerals for us.

It is also false that we cannot utilize "inorganic" minerals. And I have even seen some sites claim that the human body cannot even absorb inorganic minerals, which is also false. Take for example mineral salts? Are these people really claiming that sea salt, which has nearly the identical make up of our blood's liquid portion would not be absorbed and even if it did it would not be utilized by the body? And why is it if our body is not reliant on inorganic minerals then why is it that the mineral component of our bones is primarily the inorganic mineral hydroxyapatite? Going further with this according to their claim the distilled water only removes inorganic minerals from the body. So if their claim was true then this means that the distilled water would be removing the inorganic hydroxyapatite from the body,and thus we are back to my original claim that the distilled water leaches BENEFICIAL minerals from the body.


Distilled water will NOT leach (organic) minerals that have become part of the structure of the body cell system. Once a mineral has become part of the cell structure, it cannot be leached."

Already addressed and disproven above. But to add proof to this claim being false consider this. Let's say someone has hypercalcemia from hyperparathyroidism. According to the chelation hypothesis the minerals cannot enter the bone unchelated. Of course this is false since the primary mineral of bone is inorganic hydroxyapatite. But let's say for a second that their hypothesis is true. So the calcium released by the parathyroid hormone is excreted in the urine as a protective mechanism by the body, just as it rids itself of excess calcium from chelated sources. If we isolate the calcium from the urine that is being excreted we find that it is not chelated. The point being made is that the body does utilize non-chelated minerals, which is why we find non-chelated minerals in the body that were once chelated.

While on the topic of inorganic mineral salts though you may find this interesting:

http://www.biochemic-cell-salts.com/12-tissue-salts/dr-wilhelm-heinrich-schuessler-1821-1898/

Schuessler came to the conclusion that missing inorganic mineral salts will cause disruption to the living processes and therefore create illnesses. This results in an inhibition of the cell metabolism.


The use of distilled water whilst fasting acts as a purifier of all foreign substances (including inorganic minerals that only clog your arteries and cause havoc within the body) and which greatly aids in the elimination of toxins

Hmmm..... food is a foreign substance as is all the nutrition we derive from it. More proof that distilled water removes beneficial nutrients from the body.

And inorganic minerals do not clog the arteries. More on that later.


and if it is THAT harmful to the body, then we would derive no benefit from fruit and its juices either, as this contains exclusively distilled water via Nature.

Nature does not really provide truly distilled water. Distilled water is highly solvent and quickly sequesters carbon dioxide from the air forming carbonic acid. It also picks up inorganic and organic substances from the air as the rain or snow falls.

This brings up the point if mineralized water is so toxic then how has mankind survived so long before water distillers were invented? In fact some of the longest living and healthiest people in the world drink mineralized water coming from rivers and wells.


Nature isn't stupid: we cannot derive our minerals that have any benefit to the body such as Iron from eating metal railway sidings,

What does this have to do with Nature? This is an alloy containing iron. But if you took the metal itself and ground it up fine then our stomach acid and water would make some of these metals available to the body, but this would include the toxic metals in the alloy. So this example is pretty irrelevant.

or Calcium from eating plain chalk

Actually yes we can. Although this is dependent on the stomach acid levels or acidity of foods taken with it. Chalk is calcium carbonate, an ORGANIC MINERAL. Oyster shell and dolomite, commonly used in supplements, are also made of the ORGANIC MINERAL calcium carbonate. Studies have shown that this form of calcium is well absorbed by younger individuals due to their higher stomach acid content, or if taken with acidic foods such as tomatoes. The poorly absorbed carbonate is converted in to more readily absorbed salts through the reaction of the organic mineral with the acid.

only the plant-derived minerals as part of its edible structure are fit for human consumption, and have any bioavailability and health-benefit to the body.

Complete garbage as has been shown above.

At birth you were about 75% water. If you make it past 95 and die of old age, you will be about 25% water. You will have transformed from a plum to a raisin in your 95 plus years.

Again misleading. Age does not necessarily lead to dehydration. And at 25% water you would be looking at no joint lubrication, severe constipation, blood looking like sludge...... Two of my grandparents died at the age of 96. Both drank well water their entire lives. My grandfather has no signs of dehydration whatsoever. And he was still very active including herding cattle and fixing fences until he lost his vision, one eye due to hemorrhage from taking aspirin and the other from a piece of bailing wire piercing the other eye. After that he went in to deep depression and died shortly afterward. His wife died 3 years later. She was a little dehydrated, which is part of the reason she was incorrectly diagnosed with polycythemia vera. But I think a lot of her problem was also from depression after her husband of 64 years passed away. Their one daughter is about 94 years old and has also always drank well water. And she shows no signs of dehydration either. Where they come up with this 25% water garbage is beyond me.

It is true that the body needs minerals. It is not true that drinking water containing minerals is good for you — quite the contrary — it is lethal.

Again this is COMPLETELY FALSE!!!! See some examples above. And how do they explain all the centenarians in the world that never drank distilled water in their life? I was in Iceland for 2 1/2 months backpacking. While I was there I had to find some benzene to fuel my stove since they don't sell white gas over there. So I went to a clinic and met a doctor there who I got the benzene from. While I was there I struck up a conversation about the general health of Icelanders. Turns out that despite their generally high consumption of sugar and alcohol there is very little heart disease or cancer there. And guess what their water source is? It is not distilled water, it is mineral rich glacial and river water.

The function of minerals in the body is to serve as co-enzymes for the enzymes which direct metabolism. Without its proper mineral, an enzyme cannot function correctly. Without the function of the enzymes systems of your body, your metabolism would come to a screeching halt, and you would die immediately.

Again this is misleading. Minerals have other functions than activating enzymes. And these are not the only enzyme activators. Among other enzyme activators are vitamins. And minerals can still act as enzyme activators REGARDLESS if they are organic or inorganic. Although some inorganic minerals are poorly absorbed. For example magnesium oxide/hydroxide. A small portion of this inorganic mineral will absorb due to reaction with stomach acid turning it in to an absorbable salt. The rest will pass through the body. Other inorganic minerals though such as sodium chloride are readily absorbed and even utilized by the body.

A mineral, to be useful to the body, must be in a form in which it can be taken up by its matching enzyme.

Nonsense. And this is contradictory to their earlier statement that the mineral is an activator for the enzyme. Now they are claiming that the enzyme is making the mineral useful.

There is only one way a mineral can be utilized by an enzyme: when it is delivered to its enzyme by an organic molecule. An organic molecule is made of a string of carbon atoms. When a mineral is in such an association with an organic molecule, it is said to be chelated. A chelated mineral can be transferred to an enzyme, so that mineral can then function as a co-enzyme. A non-chelated mineral cannot be transferred; therefore, it is worse than useless.

So how do they explain the use and benefits of inorganic mineral salts by the body?

A solution of minerals in a plain electrolytic solution, to be useful in the body, must first be chelated by the body.

Again not true. Take for instance sodium chloride. One of its functions is in the production of stomach acid (hydrochloric acid, HCl), which is essential to our health. There is no chelation involved in this process. The sodium chloride is split in to sodium and chlorine. Carbon dioxide enters the picture leading to the formation of HCl from the chlorine and sodium bicarbonate from the sodium. No proteins are combined in the process to make a chelate of any kind.

The best source of straight water is distilled water. There was a time when nature provided pure, distilled drinking water in the form of rain water and melted snow, sleet, hail, etc.

As I pointed out earlier Nature does not provide us with truly distilled water. The water being aggressive will find any substance it can to saturate with. This includes carbon dioxide from the air forming carbonic acid, the same acid used to make carbonated water and sodas, and organic and inorganic particles floating in the air. This includes dust made from inorganic minerals. Even if you went to the top of the highest mountain a thousand years ago before all the industrial pollution to collect the snow up there it still would not consist of pure water. Mankind has ALWAYS survived on mineralized water since this is what Nature really provides us with.

There is no good third choice of water. Carbon-filtered water is highly touted, mainly by the people who sell carbon filtration equipment, but many minerals are left after filtration. Reverse osmosis is a better solution, but still leaves inorganic minerals present.

So why do you suppose that in order to get pure water from steam distillation for laboratory use that they have to TRIPLE DISTILL the water?

http://www.chem1.com/acad/sci/aboutwater.html

"To a chemist, the term "pure" has meaning only in the context of a particular application or process. The distilled or de-ionized water we use in the laboratory contains dissolved atmospheric gases and occasionally some silica, but their small amounts and relative inertness make these impurities insignificant for most purposes. When water of the highest obtainable purity is required for certain types of exacting measurements, it is commonly filtered, de-ionized, and triple-vacuum distilled."


The worst possible choice you can make is mineral water.

Actually the worst waters you can drink are type 1 (ultrapure water), followed by distilled, deionized and reverse osmosis waters. All of these are aggressive waters that remove beneficial vitamins and minerals from the body. All of these waters should be saturated with minerals before drinking, just like the great water Nature has always provided us with. Next on the do not drink list are highly alkaline waters that can also be corrosive like type 1 water and can interfere with nutrient absorption among other problems.

Inorganic minerals are not only unavailable as co-enzymes; worse than that, they crystallize in the body, both inside and outside the circulatory system. When they crystallize outside the circulatory system, they cause such problems as arthritis.

What a load of garbage!!! There are over 120 forms of arthritis. None of these have anything to do with drinking mineralized water. And as far as the bone spurs that form in arthritis, this has ABSOLUTELY NOTHING to do with mineral precipitation. I am not going to go in to a big long explanation of their formation, but in short it has to do with piezoelectric deposition of the minerals due to stress on the bone at a certain point.

When they crystallize inside the circulatory system, they are deposited in the walls of your arteries and, over the years, contribute to the plaque formation of atherosclerosis.

More garbage. The arterial plaque is a result of arterial inflammation. The cholesterol comes in to heal the injured area. If the source of damage is not removed then the cholesterol will continue to flood the area leading to the narrowing of the arteries. The cholesterol can calcify, but this calcium can come from a number of sources including our bones. And being that distilled water can leach minerals from the bones distilled water could also provide the calcium to calcify the cholesterol in arterial plaque.

These atherosclerotic plaques yield only to prolonged chelation therapy, and while it is true that they can be dealt with in this manner,

This is not true. Arterial plaque can be cleared through a variety of methods. Lecithin, silica, magnesium, ozone, peroxide, TMG.........

Prevention of atherosclerosis is accomplished through a diet high in fiber

Yes, fiber rich in the inorganic mineral compound orthosilicic acid. This is the form of silica the body absorbs and utilizes. It does not contain carbon, and it is not really chelated either. But it does help strengthen tissues, including blood vessels, through the formation of collagen and elastin, and helps to reduce arterial inflammation. Thank goodness for this beneficial inorganic mineral!!!

Mineral water, whether derived from bottles at a high price, or from a faucet for almost nothing, is dangerous to your health because, over the course of years, it will give you hardened arteries and arthritic joints.

Already disproven above.

For most people, at least for those who are leading busy lives, the best solution is to drink only steam distilled water.

Only if you wish to destroy your health.

If you are one of these people who drinks mineral water — perhaps that fizzy, carbonated, entertaining stuff from Calistoga or France — please know that you are doing your body no favor at all through this practice and you are spending much more for your water than you need to. Most of all you are promoting the crystallization of minerals in the soft tissues of your body and, over time, you will pay dearly for this practice.

Yet not all carbonated waters contain minerals. The purely carbonated drinks are just water with carbonic acid, the same as distilled water. The distilled water pulls carbon dioxide from the air to form carbonic acid. It is just not as saturated as the "fizzy" drinks since this level of carbonation requires pressure to force more carbon dioxide in to the water.

It should also be noted that minerals in a carbonated water can form organic carbonate minerals. So their claim of organic minerals being good is now being contradicted by their claim that carbonated mineral drinks that form organic minerals is bad. Can they make up their mind?


The purity of the water you drink is critically important to your health and vitality.

Again false. If you really wanted pure water then there is type 1 water, which is ultrapure water. But the water is highly corrosive due to its purity. The more pure water is the more aggressive it is and the more nutrients it will rob from the body.

IN ADDITION......................
Distilled water, which contains no carbon dioxide, has a neutral pH of 7.

Again VERY MISLEADING. It is well known in science that distiled and other purified waters will readily absorb carbon dioxide and other gases from the air forming a variety of acids. Unless you are making your distilled water in a vacuum distiller, which the average person is not going to have access to. The primary acids formed are carbonic acid, nitric and other nitrogen based acids and sulfuric and other sulfur based acids. They kind of admit to this later in the same paragraph. Keep in mind that rain water is a form of distilled water:

“Clean” or unpolluted rain has a slightly acidic pH of about 5.2, because carbon dioxide and water in the air react together to form carbonic acid, a weak acid (pH 5.6 in distilled water), but unpolluted rain also contains other chemicals.


The water of fruits is absolutely pure, having been DISTILLED by heaven's own process, and then canned and sealed by a skin that is impervious to germs.

The water in fruits is not pure. It is saturated with the chemicals in the fruit such as the sugar produced by photosynthesis and the minerals dissolved by the water and taken up by the plant. If the water in fruit was pure it would not have any flavor!

The juices of the watermelon, orange, lemon, and lime are among the best for drinking, and can be taken at any time, as they contain no nutriment excepting a little sugar; but the juice only should be taken, as the pulp, or cellulose, of fruit is indigestible.

The cellulose is used by the intestinal flora as a food source, and by the body as a bulk laxative. Fiber also slows the absorption of sugar so it does not spike our blood sugar so fast, helps in the formation of bile, the detoxification of estrogens, the binding of heavy metals........ If you are juicing and throwing away the pulp then you are getting rid of some of the most beneficial components of the fruit.


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 2 - James - 09-14-2013 08:33 AM

Addressing the second half of the distilled water post:

"There have been some recent rumors that the consumption of "hard" water actually lessens the chances of heart and blood vessel disease.

These are hardly rumors. Here is some information on the subject:

http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wsd/plan_protect_sustain/groundwater/gwbc/C06_health.html

"There is considerable controversy over the significance of the relative absence of certain solutes from many surface and ground water supplies. In particular, disagreement has focused on the health implications of drinking soft, low-pH waters. According to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (1977) there have been more than 50 studies, in nine countries, that have indicated an inverse relationship between water hardness and mortality from cardiovascular disease. That is, people who drink water that is deficient in magnesium and calcium generally appear more susceptible to this disease (Foster, 1987a). The US National Academy of Sciences has estimated that a nation-wide initiative to add calcium and magnesium to soft water might reduce the annual cardiovascular death rate by 150,000 in the United States. However, this suggestion is very controversial, other authors being unwilling to accept that water hardness influences the death rate from cardiovascular disease (Hammer and Heyden, 1980).

Soft water, deficient in calcium and magnesium, has also been linked to elevated rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (Caddell, 1972), diabetes (Foster, 1987b), cerebrovascular disease (Foster, 1987a) and cancer (Allen-Price, 1960; Foster, 1986). It should be noted that both surface and ground water hardness in British Columbia is very variable, being generally highest in the east of the province and lowest in the west (Swain, 1985). However, ground water in general has a tendency to be harder than surface water supplies because of its greater contact with bedrock."



http://www.mgwater.com/exhibitb.shtml

"More than 50 studies in nine countries have been carried out on possible relationship of water hardness and health. Most of the investigations were in the United Kingdom, United States, and Canada; they reveal a consistent trend of significant statistical associations between the hardness characteristics of drinking water and the incidence of cardiovascular problems (heart disease, hypertension, and stroke) and, to a lesser extent, other diseases. Generally, reports have shown an inverse correlation between the incidence of cardiovascular disease and the amount of hardness of drinking water, or, conversely, a positive correlation with the degree of softness. Studies in the United States and Canada have shown that age-adjusted cardiovascular mortality rates among populations using very soft water may be as much as 15-20% higher than among populations using hard water. The differential reported for the United Kingdom may be as high as 40%."



http://www.waternutrition.com/who.html

"Hard water is a reliable and stable4 source of calcium and sometimes magnesium although the absolute and relative concentrations will vary greatly by source. Consumption of moderately hard water containing typical amounts of calcium and magnesium may provide an important incremental percentage of their dally intake. Inadequate total dietary intakes of calcium and magnesium are common worldwide. Therefore, and incremental contribution from drinking water can be an important supplement to approach more ideal total daily intakes. Moreover, hard water can reduce the losses of calcium, magnesium and other essential minerals from food during cooking. If low mineralized water is used for food and beverage production, reduced levels of Ca, Mg and other essential elements would also occur in those products. Low intakes would occur not only because of the lower contribution of these minerals from water used in beverages, but also because of the high losses of the minerals from food products (e.g., vegetables, cereals, potatoes or meat) into water during cooking.

The group concluded that there is sufficient epidemiological evidence of an inverse relationship between calcium and magnesium concentrations in drinking water and ischemic heart disease mortality, and that consumption of water containing calcium and magnesium, and therefore also the reintroduction of Mg and Ca into demineralized water in the remineralization process would likely provide health benefits in those consumer populations. There are no known harmful human health effects associated with the addition of calcium and magnesium within a large range and the nutritional benefits are well known. In addition, limited but suggestive evidence exists for benefits associated with other diseases (stroke, renal stone formation, cognitive impairment in e4lderly, very low birth weight, bone fractures among children, pregnancy complications, hypertension, and possibly some cancers). Adding calcium and magnesium to the demineralized water would be a relatively inexpensive preventive intervention that does not require individual behavioral change, and it is already done as part of many water treatment processes. The intervention could not only provide health benefits but also help reduce medical care costs.

Epidemiological studies in the United Kingdom, United States, Sweden, Russia and France, and research on changes in calcium/phosphorus metabolism and bone decalcification provide informatio9n about drinking water levels of calcium and magnesium (and water hardness) that may provide beneficial health effects. It has been suggested that reduced cardiovascular mortality and other health benefits would be associated with minimum levels of approximately 20 to 30 mg/l calcium and 10 mg/l magnesium in drinking water. The percentage of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of calcium and magnesium provided by drinking water at these minimum levels will vary among and within countries. Thus, lower levels in water may be sufficient to provide health benefits in some areas, but higher levels may be beneficial in others. Some limited information suggests that the desirable levels may be higher in some circumstances. Overall health benefits will be dependent upon total dietary intakes and other factors in addition to water levels. Because the exposure-response information is limited, further analyses, and possibly additional studies are needed to determine the levels of calcium and magnesium that may provide most favorable population benefits in each location."

"Unless properly stabilized, demineralized and some natural waters are corrosive to plumbing resulting in damage to the plumbing systems and also potentially increased exposure on metals such as copper and lead. Information should be provided on methods of application of home water softening devices so that consumers will also have access to mineralized water for drinking and cooking."



http://www.4optimallife.com/Purified-Water-Is-Bad-For-Your-Health.html

"WHY PURIFIED WATER IS BAD FOR YOU

by Zoltan P. Rona MD, MSc

During nearly 19 years of clinical practice I have had the opportunity to observe the health effects of drinking different types of water. Most of you would agree that drinking unfiltered tap water could be hazardous to your health because of things like parasites, chlorine, fluoride and dioxins. Many health fanatics, however, are often surprised to hear me say that drinking purified water on a regular, daily basis is potentially dangerous. Paavo Airola wrote about the dangers of purified water in the 1970's when it first became a fad with the health food crowd.

Distillation is the process in which water is boiled, evaporated and the vapor condensed. Purified or reverse osmosis water is free of dissolved minerals and, because of this, has the special property of being able to actively absorb toxic substances from the body and eliminate them. Studies validate the benefits of drinking purified water when one is seeking to cleanse or detoxify the system for short periods of time (a few weeks at a time). Fasting using purified water can be dangerous because of the rapid loss of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, chloride) and trace minerals like magnesium, deficiencies of which can cause heart beat irregularities and high blood pressure. Cooking foods in purified water pulls the minerals out of them and lowers their nutrient value.

Purified water is an active absorber and when it comes into contact with air, it absorbs carbon dioxide, making it acidic. The more purified water a person drinks, the higher the body acidity becomes. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, "Purified" water, being essentially mineral-free, is very aggressive, in that it tends to dissolve substances with which it is in contact. Notably, carbon dioxide from the air is rapidly absorbed, making the water acidic and even more aggressive. Many metals are dissolved by purified water.

The most toxic commercial beverages that people consume (i.e. cola beverages and other soft drinks) are made from purified water. Studies have consistently shown that heavy consumers of soft drinks (with or without sugar) spill huge amounts of calcium, magnesium and other trace minerals into the urine. The more mineral loss, the greater the risk for osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, hypothyroidism, coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and a long list of degenerative diseases generally associated with premature aging.

A growing number of health care practitioners and scientists from around the world have been advocating the theory that aging and disease is the direct result of the accumulation of acid waste products in the body. There is a great deal of scientific documentation that supports such a theory. A poor diet may be partially to blame for the waste accumulation. Meats, sugar, white flour products, fried foods, soft drinks, processed foods, alcohol, dairy products and other junk foods cause the body to become more acidic. Stress, whether mental or physical can lead to acid deposits in the body.

There is a correlation between the consumption of soft water (purified water is extremely soft) and the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Cells, tissues and organs do not like to be dipped in acid and will do anything to buffer this acidity including the removal of minerals from the skeleton and the manufacture of bicarbonate in the blood. The longer one drinks purified water, the more likely the development of mineral deficiencies and an acid state. I have done well over 3000 mineral evaluations using a combination of blood, urine and hair tests in my practice. Almost without exception, people who consume purified water exclusively, eventually develop multiple mineral deficiencies. Those who supplement their purified water intake with trace minerals are not as deficient but still not as adequately nourished in minerals as their non-purified water drinking counterparts even after several years of mineral supplementation.

The ideal water for the human body should be slightly alkaline and this requires the presence of minerals like calcium and magnesium. Purified water tends to be acidic and can only be recommended as a way of drawing poisons out of the body. Once this is accomplished, the continued drinking of purified water is a bad idea.

Water filtered through a solid charcoal filter is slightly alkaline. Ozonation of this charcoal filtered water is ideal for daily drinking. Longevity is associated with the regular consumption of hard water (high in minerals). Ionized Water is the best possible drinking water. Disease and early death is more likely to be seen with the long term drinking of purified water. Avoid it except in special circumstances.

REFERENCES

Airola, P. 1974. How To Get Well. Phoenix, AZ: Health Plus Publishers.

Baroody, Dr. Theodore A. Jr. Alkalinize or Die. California:Portal Books, 1995.

Haas, Elson M. Staying Healthy with Nutrition. The Complete Guide to Diet & Nutritional Medicine. Berkeley, California:Celestial Arts, 1992; p. 22.

Rona, Zoltan P. and Martin, Jeanne Marie. Return to the Joy of Health, Vancouver: Alive Books, 1995.

Rona, Zoltan P. Childhood Illness and The Allergy Connection. Rocklin, California:Prima Books, 1996.

Dr. Zoltan P. Rona is a graduate of McGill University Medical School (1977) and has a Master's Degree in Biochemistry and Clinical Nutrition from the University of Bridgeport in Connecticut (1985). He is the author of the Canadian bestsellers, "The Joy of Health" and "Return to the Joy of Health". He is a past president of the Canadian Holistic Medical Association and is a consultant on nutritional medicine to the Motherisk Program of the Department of Pharmacology of the Toronto Hospital for Sick Children."



Allen McDaniels, M.D., from his book: "Water---what's in it for you?"

"Water Hardness" is the underlying cause of many, if not all, of the diseases resulting from poisons in the intestinal tract. These(hard minerals) pass from the intestinal walls and get into the lymphatic system, which delivers all of it's products to the blood, which in turn, distributes to all parts of the body. This is the cause of much human disease.

Moreless would have an absolute fit with this one. According to Moreless all disease is from acidity of the lymphatic system. Here they are claiming that alkaline minerals (they would have to be in a highly alkaline state to precipitate out) in the lymphatic system is the cause of nearly all if not all diseases.

"Water Hardness" is inorganic minerals in solution(in water). When these minerals enter the intestines in drinking water, there is an immediate reaction between them and the fats, oils and fatty acids present, causing precipitation of inorganic calcium, magnesium, iron and so on---to form new, insoluble compounds."

Total nonsense. But instead of going in to a long explanation of why let's put it this way. In order for minerals to absorb in to the bloodstream they must be soluble. Therefore, if they form insoluble complexes in the intestines they cannot be absorbed and make it to the lymphatic system. So they are contradicting their own statements!!!

Inorganic minerals contaminate the human body, (they) form incrustations that clog and obstruct the human pipe system(arteries and digestive tracts) and impair the vital organs.

Once again, if they form insoluble complexes in the intestines then they can not be absorbed to plug the arteries and organs as they are claiming. Actually even if they are absorbed they would not plug the arteries or organs as they are claiming. I addressed this myth partially in my last post.

"When distilled water enters the body, it leaves no residue of any kind. It is free of salts and sodium.

But it leaches minerals from the body, which can lead to all sorts of health issues.

It is the most perfect water for the healthy functioning of the kidneys(83% water). It is the perfect liquid for the blood(83% water),

They are overlooking the fact that blood also naturally contains inorganic mineral salts.

"The greatest damage done by inorganic minerals---plus waxy cholesterol and salt---is to the small arteries and other blood vessels of the brain(75% water). Hardening of the arteries and calcification of blood vessels starts on the day you start taking inorganic chemicals(and minerals from tap water) into our bodies."

I addressed this myth in my last post.

"Distilled water is the greatest solvent on earth. (It is) the only water that can be taken into the body without damage to the tissues.

Well the first statement is true. It is this solvency that allows distilled water to leach vitamins and minerals from the body.

"What we as scientists and the public have never realized is that minerals collected in the body from water are all inorganic minerals, which cannot be assimilated(digested) by the body.

Minerals are not really "digested' by the body. We do assimilate them in the form of absorption though.

The only minerals that the body can utilize are the organic minerals(from fruits and vegetables).

Total nonsense.

All other types of minerals are foreign substances to the body and must be disposed of or eliminated.

All the fruits and vegetables are foreign substances to the body. Think about it.

"Distilled water is the purest form available. Distilled water helps to excrete excessive heavy metals from the body."

Purified waters are corrosive and can easily pick up heavy metals from the containers they are in.

"These is only one water that is clean, steam distilled water. No other substance on our planet does so much to keep us healthy and get us well as water does."

Leaching beneficial vitamins and minerals from the body is hardly healthy.

"Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sufferers are instructed to drink distilled water."

By who? Someone that does not know squat about how the body works? Do they really think throwing the electrolytes off and leaching magnesium needed for ATP formation is going to help chronic fatigue? If anything it is likely to worsen the condition.
"If you wish to drink water, you should drink distilled water if it is available. Mountain spring water is not ideal for the human body because it contains inorganic minerals that the human body can neither use nor precipitate out.

Again contradictory to their earlier statement that the minerals form insoluble compounds in the intestines. What happens when they form insoluble compounds? Yep, they precipitate out because they are not soluble (dissolvable).

These inorganic minerals tend to hook up with cholesterol in the body and form a thick plaque in the arteries. Distilled water does not have this effect.

Again contradictory to the earlier claims. If the minerals precipitate in the intestines then they cannot absorb to cause arterial plaque calcification as is repeatedly erroneously claimed. I addressed this myth in my last post.

"When you eat a piece of fruit or a vegetable, you are consuming distilled water. The minerals are taken from the soil, the plant distills them, and then you consume them.

This is the most ridiculous claim yet. The water in a fruit or vegetable is not distilled. It is saturated with the minerals, sugars and various other compounds the water has dissolved. Thus it is not pure and not distilled. Even the water the plant absorbs has saturated with inorganic and organic minerals as well as other substances before the plants absorb it. So to claim this is distilled water is an outright lie.

"Highly mineralized water has been associated with the formation of (kidney) stones in the urinary system".

Again how can the minerals get to the kidneys if they are precipitated in the intestines and therefore not absorbed? And it seems to me that leaching minerals from the body with distilled water would increase the risk of kidney stones as the mineral saturated water is excreted.

"...the amounts of minerals found in water are insignificant when compared to those found in the foods we eat.

Oh, another contradiction. If the food sources have a higher mineral content than the water, and the water supposedly causes kidney stones then we would have to conclude that fruits and vegetables would be more likely to cause kidney stones according to their hypothesis.

On top of that contradiction is the contradiction against those who claim that our fruits and vegetables are lacking nutrition due to the mineral depleted soils. Anyone else confused over all their contradictory claims?



RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 3 - James - 09-14-2013 08:38 AM

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Purified_water#cite_note-20

Health effects

Distillation removes all minerals from water, and the membrane methods of reverse osmosis and nanofiltration remove most to all minerals. This results in demineralized water which is not considered ideal drinking water. The World Health Organization investigated the health effects of demineralized water in 1980, and its experiments in humans found that demineralized water increased diuresis and the elimination of electrolytes, with decreased serum potassium concentration. Magnesium, calcium, fluoride, and other nutrients in water can help to protect against nutritional deficiency. Demineralized water may also increase the risk from toxic metals because it more readily absorbs them, and because the presence of calcium and magnesium in water can prevent absorption of lead and cadmium. Recommendations for magnesium have been put at a minimum of 10 mg/L with 20–30 mg/L optimum; for calcium a 20 mg/L minimum and a 40–80 mg/L optimum, and a total water hardness (adding magnesium and calcium) of 2–4 mmol/L. At water hardness above 5 mmol/L, higher incidence of gallstones, kidney stones, urinary stones, arthrosis, and arthropathies have been observed. For fluoride the concentration recommended for dental health is 0.5–1.0 mg/L, with a maximum guideline value of 1.5 mg/L to avoid dental fluorosis.[17]

Water filtration devices are becoming increasingly common in households. Most of these devices do not distill water, though there continues to be an increase in consumer-oriented water distillers and reverse osmosis machines being sold and used. Municipal water supplies often add or have trace impurities at levels which are regulated to be safe for consumption. Much of these additional impurities, such as volatile organic compounds, fluoride, and an estimated 75,000+ other chemical compounds[18][19][20] are not removed through conventional filtration; however, distillation and reverse osmosis eliminate nearly all of these impurities.

The drinking of purified water has been both advocated and discouraged for health reasons. Purified water lacks minerals and ions, such as calcium, which are normally found in potable (drinking) water, and which have important biological functions such as in nervous system homeostasis. Some percentage of our daily consumption of these minerals and ions come from our drinking water, but most of them come from the food we eat, making DI water perfectly fine to drink if one has food in his or her system. The lack of naturally-occurring minerals in distilled water has raised some concerns. The Journal of General Internal Medicine[21]published a study on the mineral contents of different waters available in the US. The study found that "drinking water sources available to North Americans may contain high levels of calcium, magnesium, and sodium and may provide clinically important portions of the recommended dietary intake of these minerals". It encouraged individuals to "check the mineral content of their drinking water, whether tap or bottled, and choose water most appropriate for their needs". Since distilled water is devoid of minerals, supplemental mineral intake through diet is needed to maintain proper health.

The consumption of "hard" water (water with minerals) is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects. As noted in the American Journal of Epidemiology, consumption of hard drinking water is negatively correlated with atherosclerotic heart disease.[22] Since distilled water is free of minerals, it will not have these potential benefits.



RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - Whitey - 11-30-2013 04:57 AM

Very interesting and very important.

A few months ago I was advised by my health coach to buy an RO system so I did, and I just shipped my Ecowater distiller to a friend of mine who's 63 and having arthritis issues.

Now I'm starting to feel that I disagree with my health coach on this and should drink better water, but I'm not sure what.

I'm on a detox program and trying to chelate mercury and other metals. Maybe RO water is OK for me right now but not for the long run. Do you agree or would it be better if I add FG DE to my RO water for now?

I'm taking Monolaurin to dissolve lipid coated bacteria and Hep C.
I'm a 62 year old male.

I buy Deer Park spring water which is supposed to be good quality water.

I'm curious to know what you recommend for pure water or water filtration.
I'm wanting to avoid drug residues that may be in our tap water. I live in East Tennessee, USA, and there are meth labs around this area and other ways the water could be polluted.

Friends Of Water has good filters but they aren't cheap. I think it's about $300 for a counter top unit and about $100 a year for filters.


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - Whitey - 11-30-2013 06:18 AM

Do you know of good brands of bottled water?
I've heard that Deer Park spring water is supposed to be very good quality.


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - Whitey - 11-30-2013 05:28 PM

I took the pH of RO water, it's acidic at about 6.4.
Then I took the pH of RO water that had been in fridge with FG DE in it, and it seemed to be about the same pH as RO water.

Then I took the pH of Prill water and it's at least pH 8.
Then I added some Prill water to the FG DE RO water to bring up the pH to around 7.5.

Do you think this makes a good water to drink long term?
I needed to raise the pH of the RO water, it's too acidic and I'm sure it would lower my pH more than I'd want it to if I kept drinking it.

2 or 3 months ago I was too alkaline from drinking too much Prill water. I was then told to get an RO system and it will will help lower my pH, and it did.
I do think it's a good idea to drink Prill water but not so much that it raises the pH too much.
Do you?


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - James - 01-19-2014 01:25 AM

(11-30-2013 04:57 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Very interesting and very important.

A few months ago I was advised by my health coach to buy an RO system so I did, and I just shipped my Ecowater distiller to a friend of mine who's 63 and having arthritis issues.

Now I'm starting to feel that I disagree with my health coach on this and should drink better water, but I'm not sure what.

I'm on a detox program and trying to chelate mercury and other metals. Maybe RO water is OK for me right now but not for the long run. Do you agree or would it be better if I add FG DE to my RO water for now?

I'm taking Monolaurin to dissolve lipid coated bacteria and Hep C.
I'm a 62 year old male.

I buy Deer Park spring water which is supposed to be good quality water.

I'm curious to know what you recommend for pure water or water filtration.
I'm wanting to avoid drug residues that may be in our tap water. I live in East Tennessee, USA, and there are meth labs around this area and other ways the water could be polluted.

Friends Of Water has good filters but they aren't cheap. I think it's about $300 for a counter top unit and about $100 a year for filters.

If I don't have access to spring water I like adding the food grade diatomaceous earth to my reverse osmosis water. Or add a tiny amount of a trace element salt such as Real Salt to add minerals back to the water.

If you want to chelate mercury there are all sorts of things that will do that including algins in seaweeds, phytates in grains, pectins in fruits and vegetables, chlorella, etc.

By the way, there is no common lab test that can confirm the presence of any particular virus including the hepatitis C virus. If a person has hepatitis they really should address the various causes that include hepatitis viruses, herpes viruses, bacteria, fungi, parasites, medication induced or other chemical exposure, autoimmunity or trauma.

Here is one old write up I did on hepatitis. I explain the false positives associated with the antibody tests, but not the also very inaccurate polymerase chain reaction (PCR, "viral load").:

http://www.medcapsules.com/info/Hepatitis.htm

This one covers PCR as well:

http://curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=1549308#i

And antibody testing and PCR inaccuracies:

http://curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=1549321#i

http://curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=1549328#i

http://curezone.org/forums/fm.asp?i=1549335#i


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - James - 01-19-2014 01:26 AM

(11-30-2013 06:18 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Do you know of good brands of bottled water?
I've heard that Deer Park spring water is supposed to be very good quality.

Not off hand. I rarely drink bottled water.


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - James - 01-19-2014 01:34 AM

(11-30-2013 05:28 PM)Whitey Wrote:  I took the pH of RO water, it's acidic at about 6.4.
Then I took the pH of RO water that had been in fridge with FG DE in it, and it seemed to be about the same pH as RO water.

Then I took the pH of Prill water and it's at least pH 8.
Then I added some Prill water to the FG DE RO water to bring up the pH to around 7.5.

Do you think this makes a good water to drink long term?
I needed to raise the pH of the RO water, it's too acidic and I'm sure it would lower my pH more than I'd want it to if I kept drinking it.

2 or 3 months ago I was too alkaline from drinking too much Prill water. I was then told to get an RO system and it will will help lower my pH, and it did.
I do think it's a good idea to drink Prill water but not so much that it raises the pH too much.
Do you?

Purified waters such as R/O or distilled become acidic quickly because they absorb gases from the air such as nitrogen and sulfur oxides as well as carbon dioxide forming acids. You can help reduce this by allowing the water to go directly in to a mineral source so the water saturates more with the minerals and less with the gases. Or buffer the acids with a little calcium carbonate or magnesium oxide.

The only thing in prill water that can raise the pH of the water would be the aluminum forming aluminum hydroxide. Most people do not realize that prill beads are nothing more than zeolites (aluminum silicate).


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - perrinje - 02-10-2014 11:49 AM

Hello James. This is the first time I have ever wrote on a blog. I found out about you from your interview with Markus Rothkranz on the Alkaline Myth... WOW! Changed my perspective! I have some questions and hopefully I am not going to ask anything that you have already answered somewhere else on your blog. I live in the Philippines currently and I am in the city so I need to drink filtered water from water stations that use softeners.

*If I don't have access to spring water I like adding the food grade diatomaceous earth to my reverse osmosis water. Or add a tiny amount of a trace element salt such as Real Salt to add minerals back to the water.


I have been adding about 1/2 tsp coconut vinegar to every 12 oz of water. Do you know if this mineralized the water? I looked up diatomaceous earth but couldn't find any facts relating to human health. Is it and does it have the similar effects of Zeolite? When you say Real Salt... do you mean real salt as in un-iodized bed salt or is this a type or brand... also, how much?

*If you want to chelate mercury there are all sorts of things that will do that including algins in seaweeds, phytates in grains, pectins in fruits and vegetables, chlorella, etc.

What do you think of MSM for detox? I have been taking MSM for 2 weeks now with Acerola Cherry powder to detox. I am at 18g of MSM per day and 2g of Acerola. My target is to hit 25-30g of MSM per day until I feel detoxed.

Do you recommend any type of fasting? I used to do the Master cleanse but I would add Hemp fiber to it and I would do the Sena Tea and Salt Water wash every other day instead of every day. It seemed to let the Hemp Fiber build up and man oh man I would have the craziest tar come out of my body after the 3rd to 4th day... I did this once for 21 days nd still had smelly tar coming out but I couldn't handle not having food anymore... amazing how much stuff was in my body... especially when I weighed only 165lbs at 5'9" when I started that fast. Well, I'm always looking for better ways to do things and I believe you are the guy to ask if there is a better way to fast.

I have one more question... I have been watching some of David Wolfe's stuff on youtube lately, and I am a little confused on something. He seems to be on the same track as you are, but not as detailed but he mentioned something that bothered me... he is a big fan of MSM and he is one of the reasons why I am taking it, but in a video talking about spring water, he mentioned that prings with sulfure in it are bad to drink from. Isn't MSM a form of Sulfure?

Thank you so much for your time and I really respect your opinion... your interview with Markus is the best documentary I have ever seen and I have seen so many. Again, I apologize if you talk about any of my questions in another section of your site.

Jason Perrin


RE: Distilled water is healthy myth: Part 1 - James - 03-29-2014 03:17 PM

(02-10-2014 11:49 AM)perrinje Wrote:  Hello James. This is the first time I have ever wrote on a blog. I found out about you from your interview with Markus Rothkranz on the Alkaline Myth... WOW! Changed my perspective! I have some questions and hopefully I am not going to ask anything that you have already answered somewhere else on your blog. I live in the Philippines currently and I am in the city so I need to drink filtered water from water stations that use softeners.

*If I don't have access to spring water I like adding the food grade diatomaceous earth to my reverse osmosis water. Or add a tiny amount of a trace element salt such as Real Salt to add minerals back to the water.


I have been adding about 1/2 tsp coconut vinegar to every 12 oz of water. Do you know if this mineralized the water? I looked up diatomaceous earth but couldn't find any facts relating to human health. Is it and does it have the similar effects of Zeolite?

They are similar. Zeolites are aluminum silicates with all sorts of pores giving it a very high surface area. This makes them absorbant and catalytic. There are natural and synthetic zeolites.

DE is the skeletal remains of diatoms and consists of 80% silica, 10% metal oxides (calcium, magnesium, aluminum) and 10% moisture. The health benefits are from the silica.

Here are a few articles I have written on silica:

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=3463

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=2570

http://www.medcapsules.com/info/Silica_Diatomaceous%20Earth%20vs%20Horsetail%20Grass.htm

And a Medline study on silica:

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=3575

And silica references:

http://medcapsules.com/forum/showthread.php?tid=3461


When you say Real Salt... do you mean real salt as in un-iodized bed salt or is this a type or brand... also, how much?

Real Salt is simply a brand. Also sold under other names such as Himalayan Salt. It is a pink trace element salt.

You only need a little to help reduce the solvency of the water. For instance a pinch added to a glass of water. You don't want so much that the water tastes salty.


*If you want to chelate mercury there are all sorts of things that will do that including algins in seaweeds, phytates in grains, pectins in fruits and vegetables, chlorella, etc.

What do you think of MSM for detox? I have been taking MSM for 2 weeks now with Acerola Cherry powder to detox. I am at 18g of MSM per day and 2g of Acerola. My target is to hit 25-30g of MSM per day until I feel detoxed.

Sulfur compounds are good for mercury detox. Onions, garlic, horseradish, watercress, etc.

Do you recommend any type of fasting?

No, I don't believe in fasting. In my opinion it puts too much stress on the body.

I used to do the Master cleanse but I would add Hemp fiber to it and I would do the Sena Tea and Salt Water wash every other day instead of every day.

Be really careful with senna. It is powerful laxative and can cause a laxative dependence with regular use.

It seemed to let the Hemp Fiber build up and man oh man I would have the craziest tar come out of my body after the 3rd to 4th day... I did this once for 21 days nd still had smelly tar coming out but I couldn't handle not having food anymore... amazing how much stuff was in my body... especially when I weighed only 165lbs at 5'9" when I started that fast. Well, I'm always looking for better ways to do things and I believe you are the guy to ask if there is a better way to fast.

I have one more question... I have been watching some of David Wolfe's stuff on youtube lately, and I am a little confused on something. He seems to be on the same track as you are, but not as detailed but he mentioned something that bothered me... he is a big fan of MSM and he is one of the reasons why I am taking it, but in a video talking about spring water, he mentioned that prings with sulfure in it are bad to drink from. Isn't MSM a form of Sulfure?

Yes, you are right. MSM is 34% sulfur by weight and breaks down in to elemental sulfur in the body.

A lot of people don't realize either that commercial MSM is a synthetic chemical made by the heating of the industrial solvent DMSO (dimethylsulfoxide), which converts the DMSO in to DMSO2, also known as MSM.


Thank you so much for your time and I really respect your opinion... your interview with Markus is the best documentary I have ever seen and I have seen so many. Again, I apologize if you talk about any of my questions in another section of your site.

Jason Perrin