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Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 04-07-2013 07:59 PM

I bought some potassium citrate to help with my wife's leg cramps which happen in the evening. The bottle says it contains 99 mg per capsule and to take one capsule daily. Isn't this too little? I just found out that the daily requirement for potassium is 4,700 mg, so why on earth do they sell potassium pills with so little content and yet recommend only one capsule a day? How many capsules of this should my wife take? I'm thinking that if my wife is potassium deficient (hence the leg cramps), let's say she only gets 1,000 mg of potassium from food daily, then even ten 99-mg pills are not enough since that's only 990 mg additional potassium from supplementation. BTW, my wife has diabetes type II and hypertension, if that's an important factor to take into consideration.

Thanks!


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 04-15-2013 11:44 PM

(04-07-2013 07:59 PM)mtl777 Wrote:  I bought some potassium citrate to help with my wife's leg cramps which happen in the evening. The bottle says it contains 99 mg per capsule and to take one capsule daily. Isn't this too little? I just found out that the daily requirement for potassium is 4,700 mg, so why on earth do they sell potassium pills with so little content and yet recommend only one capsule a day? How many capsules of this should my wife take? I'm thinking that if my wife is potassium deficient (hence the leg cramps), let's say she only gets 1,000 mg of potassium from food daily, then even ten 99-mg pills are not enough since that's only 990 mg additional potassium from supplementation. BTW, my wife has diabetes type II and hypertension, if that's an important factor to take into consideration.

Thanks!

To start with, the most common cause of muscle cramping is excess calcium and/or low magnesium. Low potassium can cause this, but is not that common unless the person is losing a lot of potassium for some reason such as they are on loop diuretics. The body can release or retain potassium under normal circumstances to maintain a balance with sodium.

There are several reasons the amount of potassium in supplements is so low. Some forms of potassium can be corrosive to the tissues. Even with the common forms used in supplements and medicine, gastrointestinal complaints have been known to occur at levels as low as 1,500mg. This includes potassium not only from supplements but also diet.

There are also conditions in which taking potassium is contradicted such as if on potassium sparing diuretics or in cases of kidney disease resulting in hyperkalemia (high potassium).

In addition, potassium and sodium are antagonistic to each other so low levels of one can lead to higher levels of the other.

Bottom line is the reason they likely use such doses of potassium is that there are so many other factors that are going to affect potassium levels and therefore it is best to error on the side of caution.

Being diabetic though I would especially recommend supplementing with magnesium malate instead. Magnesium malate will not only help with insulin production and sensitivity, but it also helps to relax the muscles and prevent insulin damage in diabetics.



RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 04-16-2013 12:41 AM

(04-15-2013 11:44 PM)James Wrote:  To start with, the most common cause of muscle cramping is excess calcium and/or low magnesium. Low potassium can cause this, but is not that common unless the person is losing a lot of potassium for some reason such as they are on loop diuretics. The body can release or retain potassium under normal circumstances to maintain a balance with sodium.

There are several reasons the amount of potassium in supplements is so low. Some forms of potassium can be corrosive to the tissues. Even with the common forms used in supplements and medicine, gastrointestinal complaints have been known to occur at levels as low as 1,500mg. This includes potassium not only from supplements but also diet.

There are also conditions in which taking potassium is contradicted such as if on potassium sparing diuretics or in cases of kidney disease resulting in hyperkalemia (high potassium).

In addition, potassium and sodium are antagonistic to each other so low levels of one can lead to higher levels of the other.

Bottom line is the reason they likely use such doses of potassium is that there are so many other factors that are going to affect potassium levels and therefore it is best to error on the side of caution.

Being diabetic though I would especially recommend supplementing with magnesium malate instead. Magnesium malate will not only help with insulin production and sensitivity, but it also helps to relax the muscles and prevent insulin damage in diabetics.

Thanks James! I am already giving my wife magnesium citrate. I just thought of adding the potassium because my uncle who's a doctor told me that leg cramps are due to potassium deficiency. Since I already bought the potassium, I might as well let my wife use it if it won't do any harm. Is potassium citrate corrosive to the tissues? How much dosage would you suggest?


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 05-16-2013 02:00 AM

(04-16-2013 12:41 AM)mtl777 Wrote:  
(04-15-2013 11:44 PM)James Wrote:  To start with, the most common cause of muscle cramping is excess calcium and/or low magnesium. Low potassium can cause this, but is not that common unless the person is losing a lot of potassium for some reason such as they are on loop diuretics. The body can release or retain potassium under normal circumstances to maintain a balance with sodium.

There are several reasons the amount of potassium in supplements is so low. Some forms of potassium can be corrosive to the tissues. Even with the common forms used in supplements and medicine, gastrointestinal complaints have been known to occur at levels as low as 1,500mg. This includes potassium not only from supplements but also diet.

There are also conditions in which taking potassium is contradicted such as if on potassium sparing diuretics or in cases of kidney disease resulting in hyperkalemia (high potassium).

In addition, potassium and sodium are antagonistic to each other so low levels of one can lead to higher levels of the other.

Bottom line is the reason they likely use such doses of potassium is that there are so many other factors that are going to affect potassium levels and therefore it is best to error on the side of caution.

Being diabetic though I would especially recommend supplementing with magnesium malate instead. Magnesium malate will not only help with insulin production and sensitivity, but it also helps to relax the muscles and prevent insulin damage in diabetics.

Thanks James! I am already giving my wife magnesium citrate. I just thought of adding the potassium because my uncle who's a doctor told me that leg cramps are due to potassium deficiency. Since I already bought the potassium, I might as well let my wife use it if it won't do any harm. Is potassium citrate corrosive to the tissues? How much dosage would you suggest?

Low potassium can cause leg cramps as well, but is not a common cause. Usually this is only seen in people who are losing potassium due to diuretics, kidney or aldosterone issues or maybe excessive salt intake.

Potassium citrate can be corrosive to the stomach if it remains too long. They are sometimes coated to help reduce this problem. Taking the potassium with a full meal can also help reduce digestive system issues.

The recommended dose is 99mg 2-3 times with full meals.



RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 05-18-2013 09:26 PM

(05-16-2013 02:00 AM)James Wrote:  
(04-16-2013 12:41 AM)mtl777 Wrote:  
(04-15-2013 11:44 PM)James Wrote:  To start with, the most common cause of muscle cramping is excess calcium and/or low magnesium. Low potassium can cause this, but is not that common unless the person is losing a lot of potassium for some reason such as they are on loop diuretics. The body can release or retain potassium under normal circumstances to maintain a balance with sodium.

There are several reasons the amount of potassium in supplements is so low. Some forms of potassium can be corrosive to the tissues. Even with the common forms used in supplements and medicine, gastrointestinal complaints have been known to occur at levels as low as 1,500mg. This includes potassium not only from supplements but also diet.

There are also conditions in which taking potassium is contradicted such as if on potassium sparing diuretics or in cases of kidney disease resulting in hyperkalemia (high potassium).

In addition, potassium and sodium are antagonistic to each other so low levels of one can lead to higher levels of the other.

Bottom line is the reason they likely use such doses of potassium is that there are so many other factors that are going to affect potassium levels and therefore it is best to error on the side of caution.

Being diabetic though I would especially recommend supplementing with magnesium malate instead. Magnesium malate will not only help with insulin production and sensitivity, but it also helps to relax the muscles and prevent insulin damage in diabetics.

Thanks James! I am already giving my wife magnesium citrate. I just thought of adding the potassium because my uncle who's a doctor told me that leg cramps are due to potassium deficiency. Since I already bought the potassium, I might as well let my wife use it if it won't do any harm. Is potassium citrate corrosive to the tissues? How much dosage would you suggest?

Low potassium can cause leg cramps as well, but is not a common cause. Usually this is only seen in people who are losing potassium due to diuretics, kidney or aldosterone issues or maybe excessive salt intake.

Potassium citrate can be corrosive to the stomach if it remains too long. They are sometimes coated to help reduce this problem. Taking the potassium with a full meal can also help reduce digestive system issues.

The recommended dose is 99mg 2-3 times with full meals.

I heard of some people taking potassium citrate powder dissolved in water. I'm thinking of trying this by opening up a capsule and pouring its potassium citrate powder contents into a glass of water. Is this a bad idea?

And what if I add to this a little sea salt and maybe a little sodium bicarbonate to neutralize whatever it is (acids?) that's making it corrosive. Will it fix the problem? In this case I'm trying to make an electrolyte drink that could be taken after a workout.

Speaking of electrolyte drinks, maybe I should just use dulse dissolved in water instead. Is this a better idea? Do you know the sodium, potassium and other minerals content of dulse? Where can I get this info?


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 05-26-2013 01:10 AM

Thanks James! I am already giving my wife magnesium citrate. I just thought of adding the potassium because my uncle who's a doctor told me that leg cramps are due to potassium deficiency.

In some cases. But this is not as common as muscle cramps from magnesium deficiency and/or high serum calcium.

Since I already bought the potassium, I might as well let my wife use it if it won't do any harm. Is potassium citrate corrosive to the tissues?

Yes, but the risk can be decrease by taking potassium with large meals.

How much dosage would you suggest?

For the average person 99mg 2-3 times daily is fine. Potassium can also help with other things including keeping blood pressure down in some cases, acting as a diuretic, etc.
[/quote]

Low potassium can cause leg cramps as well, but is not a common cause. Usually this is only seen in people who are losing potassium due to diuretics, kidney or aldosterone issues or maybe excessive salt intake.

Potassium citrate can be corrosive to the stomach if it remains too long. They are sometimes coated to help reduce this problem. Taking the potassium with a full meal can also help reduce digestive system issues.

The recommended dose is 99mg 2-3 times with full meals.


[/quote]

I heard of some people taking potassium citrate powder dissolved in water. I'm thinking of trying this by opening up a capsule and pouring its potassium citrate powder contents into a glass of water. Is this a bad idea?

Other than the fact that it is going to taste really nasty there is not a problem with doing this. If you want a good tasting source of potassium I would go with watermelon now that it is back in season.

And what if I add to this a little sea salt and maybe a little sodium bicarbonate to neutralize whatever it is (acids?) that's making it corrosive. Will it fix the problem? In this case I'm trying to make an electrolyte drink that could be taken after a workout.

I doubt those will work. In fact, the baking soda could make things worse by delaying gastric emptying. The stomach has to become sufficiently acidic to empty out, which is why alkaline baking soda would be a really bad idea.

If you want an electrolyte drink I would just use a trace element salt such as Real Salt, which contains sodium, potassium and other electrolytes.

Seal salt could be an alternative, but many are refined and thus do not contain potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc.


Speaking of electrolyte drinks, maybe I should just use dulse dissolved in water instead. Is this a better idea?

There are various herbs that can be used as excellent electrolyte sources including seaweeds and nettle leaf. The drawback to these is they do not have the storage time of using a trace element salt.

Do you know the sodium, potassium and other minerals content of dulse? Where can I get this info?

I found this site that should answer your question:


http://foods-high-in.net/seaweed-dulse-laver-nori-dried,2499.html

[/quote]


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 05-28-2013 07:44 PM

Quote:I heard of some people taking potassium citrate powder dissolved in water. I'm thinking of trying this by opening up a capsule and pouring its potassium citrate powder contents into a glass of water. Is this a bad idea?

Other than the fact that it is going to taste really nasty there is not a problem with doing this. If you want a good tasting source of potassium I would go with watermelon now that it is back in season.

I was actually just wondering if potassium when drank as a solution in water is dangerous because I read that when it's taken intravenously it can kill. So it's safe when it's drank then. Big difference.

Quote:And what if I add to this a little sea salt and maybe a little sodium bicarbonate to neutralize whatever it is (acids?) that's making it corrosive. Will it fix the problem? In this case I'm trying to make an electrolyte drink that could be taken after a workout.

I doubt those will work. In fact, the baking soda could make things worse by delaying gastric emptying. The stomach has to become sufficiently acidic to empty out, which is why alkaline baking soda would be a really bad idea.

If you want an electrolyte drink I would just use a trace element salt such as Real Salt, which contains sodium, potassium and other electrolytes.

Seal salt could be an alternative, but many are refined and thus do not contain potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc.

Thanks for the tip on Real Salt. How does Real Salt compare with Himalayan Sea Salt? I found this info on Himalayan Sea Salt and it seems to be good too...

http://www.atthemeadow.com/shop/Resources/Minerals-in-Pink-Himalayan-Salt

Though what I really want in an electrolyte drink is a potassium to sodium ratio of 2:1 or even 3:1, because our average diet already has too much sodium but too little of potassium. So I want to try mixing the contents of one or two capsules of potassium citrate with Real Salt in a glass of water. Maybe also add a little apple cider vinegar. What do you think of this?

Quote:Speaking of electrolyte drinks, maybe I should just use dulse dissolved in water instead. Is this a better idea?

There are various herbs that can be used as excellent electrolyte sources including seaweeds and nettle leaf. The drawback to these is they do not have the storage time of using a trace element salt.

Do you know the sodium, potassium and other minerals content of dulse? Where can I get this info?

I found this site that should answer your question:


http://foods-high-in.net/seaweed-dulse-laver-nori-dried,2499.html

Thanks for the link!

I don't quite follow what you mean by "storage time of using a trace element salt". In the link you gave, I see that dulse has 299.2224 mg sodium per 100 g. Doesn't the sodium here qualify as salt?

Also I see that dulse has 2219.2331 mg potassium per 100 g. That makes a 7.4:1 potassium to sodium ratio. If I add some Real Salt, I could get it to 2:1 or 3:1. Maybe dulse + Real Salt is the ticket for what I want, not potassium citrate + Real Salt. Do you think this is better?

BTW I found this product that contains 400 mg potassium citrate and 100 mg sodium chloride:

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/vega-sport-electrolyte-hydrator-pom-berry-30-0-13-oz-pkts

Is there any difference between the potassium citrate that it's using and the potassium citrate supplement that I bought? Because it's using a lot of potassium citrate (equivalent to about four 99-mg capsules of my supplement) so I wonder if that's gonna cause those problems of being corrosive to the stomach?


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 05-29-2013 12:30 AM

(05-28-2013 07:44 PM)mtl777 Wrote:  
Quote:I heard of some people taking potassium citrate powder dissolved in water. I'm thinking of trying this by opening up a capsule and pouring its potassium citrate powder contents into a glass of water. Is this a bad idea?

Other than the fact that it is going to taste really nasty there is not a problem with doing this. If you want a good tasting source of potassium I would go with watermelon now that it is back in season.

I was actually just wondering if potassium when drank as a solution in water is dangerous because I read that when it's taken intravenously it can kill. So it's safe when it's drank then. Big difference.

Taking too much orally can also kill you. That is why potassium supplements are in such low dosages. To much potassium can stop the heart. What you are likely referring to is lethal injections, which rely on an overdose of potassium to stop the heart.


[quote]
And what if I add to this a little sea salt and maybe a little sodium bicarbonate to neutralize whatever it is (acids?) that's making it corrosive. Will it fix the problem? In this case I'm trying to make an electrolyte drink that could be taken after a workout.

I doubt those will work. In fact, the baking soda could make things worse by delaying gastric emptying. The stomach has to become sufficiently acidic to empty out, which is why alkaline baking soda would be a really bad idea.

If you want an electrolyte drink I would just use a trace element salt such as Real Salt, which contains sodium, potassium and other electrolytes.

Seal salt could be an alternative, but many are refined and thus do not contain potassium, magnesium, calcium, etc.

Thanks for the tip on Real Salt. How does Real Salt compare with Himalayan Sea Salt? I found this info on Himalayan Sea Salt and it seems to be good too...

http://www.atthemeadow.com/shop/Resources/Minerals-in-Pink-Himalayan-Salt

This is the same salt as Real Salt. These are not really "sea salts" they are mined salts from ancient sea beds. Calling these sea salts is as bad as when Wallach was claiming his colloidal minerals were plant derived when in fact they were ground up shale with plant fossils from Utah.


Though what I really want in an electrolyte drink is a potassium to sodium ratio of 2:1 or even 3:1, because our average diet already has too much sodium but too little of potassium. So I want to try mixing the contents of one or two capsules of potassium citrate with Real Salt in a glass of water. Maybe also add a little apple cider vinegar. What do you think of this?

I hope you don't have a strong gag reflexBig Grin Potassium salts are pretty nasty tasting on their own. Add the extra salt and vinegar and I just cannot imagine what that is going to taste like. But it would keep better.

You can also try adding some plain stevia extract without the flow agents like malatodextrin, lactose or erythritol if you like. This should help a lot with the flavor and without the flow agents it will still keep well.

There are also flavored stevia drops such as grape, cherry, mango, peach, etc. that would further help mask the flavor.


Quote:Speaking of electrolyte drinks, maybe I should just use dulse dissolved in water instead. Is this a better idea?

There are various herbs that can be used as excellent electrolyte sources including seaweeds and nettle leaf. The drawback to these is they do not have the storage time of using a trace element salt.

I don't quite follow what you mean by "storage time of using a trace element salt".

In short, when you add organic material to a liquid it can pose several problems. Vitamins for example are rapidly destroyed in a liquid medium, which is why I do not like or recommend liquid vitamins. In this case though the addition of a seaweed would pose a second problem, which is the growth of bacteria and fungus because of the liquid environment. If you stick to the salts, vinegar and even the stevia extract you do not have to worry about the solution molding or developing bacteria overgrowth quickly.

In the link you gave, I see that dulse has 299.2224 mg sodium per 100 g. Doesn't the sodium here qualify as salt?

Yes, as sodium salt. There are many forms of salt including potassium salts, magnesium salts, calcium salts, etc.


Also I see that dulse has 2219.2331 mg potassium per 100 g. That makes a 7.4:1 potassium to sodium ratio. If I add some Real Salt, I could get it to 2:1 or 3:1. Maybe dulse + Real Salt is the ticket for what I want, not potassium citrate + Real Salt. Do you think this is better?

That sounds like an awful high potassium content. You might want to check some other sources and verify that first to make sure they did not make a mistake or a misprint. I know that seaweeds were often burned and the ashes used to make lye for soap due to the high potassium content, but I did not think the sodium to potassium ratio was that far apart.

If you are going to consume the product right away then dulse is great and provides other benefits that Real Salt would not provide. On the other hand if you are going to pre-make large amounts of the drink and store it then the potassium citrate would be a better choice for the storage.


BTW I found this product that contains 400 mg potassium citrate and 100 mg sodium chloride:

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/vega-sport-electrolyte-hydrator-pom-berry-30-0-13-oz-pkts

Is there any difference between the potassium citrate that it's using and the potassium citrate supplement that I bought? Because it's using a lot of potassium citrate (equivalent to about four 99-mg capsules of my supplement) so I wonder if that's gonna cause those problems of being corrosive to the stomach?

All the potassium citrate is the same. There are only a few manufacturers of the raw material, but chemically it is all the same. Then the product manufacturers buy the stuff in bulk and make their products either as straight potassium citrate or as a formula or add it to supplements or formulas that are not just for potassium supplementation such as a multivitamin.

The risk is greatest when used as a tablet since the tablet can concentrate the potassium on the stomach wall just like throwing chlorine tablets directly in to a plaster pool can eat away at the plaster where the tablet lay. In a dissolved form and especially with food in the stomach the risk is greatly decreased.



RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 05-30-2013 04:35 PM

Quote:I was actually just wondering if potassium when drank as a solution in water is dangerous because I read that when it's taken intravenously it can kill. So it's safe when it's drank then. Big difference.

Taking too much orally can also kill you. That is why potassium supplements are in such low dosages. To much potassium can stop the heart. What you are likely referring to is lethal injections, which rely on an overdose of potassium to stop the heart.

I read an article that said the RDA for potassium used to be very low (99 mg IIRC) but now it is what it should be, 4700 mg (what a big difference!). It said that the reason why the RDA was very low is because there was a conspiracy to keep people unhealthy by promoting high blood pressure through a very low potassium to sodium ratio. I wonder how true this is?

Quote:If you are going to consume the product right away then dulse is great and provides other benefits that Real Salt would not provide. On the other hand if you are going to pre-make large amounts of the drink and store it then the potassium citrate would be a better choice for the storage.

It will be prepared and drank on the spot, so I guess I will settle for dulse + Real Salt + stevia + ACV.

BTW I have heard of a mixture of black strap molasses + ACV + turmeric that was recommended for cancer patients. The black strap molasses, due to its glucose content, was said to act as a Trojan horse to coax the cancer cells into "consuming" the mixture, and then afterwards the turmeric in the mixture kills off the pathogens in the cancer cells. What do you think of this? Maybe I should add black strap molasses and turmeric to the drink. Ha-ha, this is becoming more than just an electrolyte drink! Big Grin

Quote:BTW I found this product that contains 400 mg potassium citrate and 100 mg sodium chloride:

http://www.swansonvitamins.com/vega-sport-electrolyte-hydrator-pom-berry-30-0-13-oz-pkts

Is there any difference between the potassium citrate that it's using and the potassium citrate supplement that I bought? Because it's using a lot of potassium citrate (equivalent to about four 99-mg capsules of my supplement) so I wonder if that's gonna cause those problems of being corrosive to the stomach?

All the potassium citrate is the same. There are only a few manufacturers of the raw material, but chemically it is all the same. Then the product manufacturers buy the stuff in bulk and make their products either as straight potassium citrate or as a formula or add it to supplements or formulas that are not just for potassium supplementation such as a multivitamin.

Thanks, that's good to know. I was just really wondering if they used a different kind of potassium citrate because they are using so much of it in their formula, yet they do not give any warning of stomach upset or anything like that.

Quote:The risk is greatest when used as a tablet since the tablet can concentrate the potassium on the stomach wall just like throwing chlorine tablets directly in to a plaster pool can eat away at the plaster where the tablet lay. In a dissolved form and especially with food in the stomach the risk is greatly decreased.

Dissolving potassium citrate in water is good then.

Thanks very much!


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 06-04-2013 07:31 PM

[quote='mtl777' pid='7264' dateline='1369953359']

I read an article that said the RDA for potassium used to be very low (99 mg IIRC) but now it is what it should be, 4700 mg (what a big difference!). It said that the reason why the RDA was very low is because there was a conspiracy to keep people unhealthy by promoting high blood pressure through a very low potassium to sodium ratio. I wonder how true this is?

I seriously doubt that. First of all there are many causes of high blood pressure. Sodium induced hypertension is very rare since only about 10% of hypertensive patients are sodium sensitive.

One of the reasons for this is that the body generally does an excellent job of regulating its sodium-potassium balance eliminating what is in excess and retaining what is low.

There are several reasons I can think of as to why the RDA would be so low. First of all RDAs are the absolute minimum daily requirement for health. Look at how low the RDA is for vitamin C for example. Secondly would be the gastric irritation, especially with some form of potassium supplements. And finally, some people are taking medications that can cause potassium retention or can have conditions such as kidney issues that lead to abnormal potassium retention making higher RDAs an issue.


[quote]
BTW I have heard of a mixture of black strap molasses + ACV + turmeric that was recommended for cancer patients. The black strap molasses, due to its glucose content, was said to act as a Trojan horse to coax the cancer cells into "consuming" the mixture, and then afterwards the turmeric in the mixture kills off the pathogens in the cancer cells. What do you think of this? Maybe I should add black strap molasses and turmeric to the drink. Ha-ha, this is becoming more than just an electrolyte drink! Big Grin

If that were true then why wouldn't any food containing simple sugars, which is about everything including meats, work?

They are also overlooking the fact that cancer cells do not feed exclusively on glucose. They can also use some other sugars, amino acids and lactate for fuel.

Another problem I have with that claim is the high iron content of black strap molasses. Free iron in particular can be used to fuel the growth of many microbes including cancer pathogens and can help promote cancer itself. This is why supplements like inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, phytic acid) are used in the treatment of cancers. The phytic acid has a high affinity for free iron and removes it from the system inhibiting cancer pathogens and cancer cells.



RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - mtl777 - 06-06-2013 12:24 PM

Quote:BTW I have heard of a mixture of black strap molasses + ACV + turmeric that was recommended for cancer patients. The black strap molasses, due to its glucose content, was said to act as a Trojan horse to coax the cancer cells into "consuming" the mixture, and then afterwards the turmeric in the mixture kills off the pathogens in the cancer cells. What do you think of this? Maybe I should add black strap molasses and turmeric to the drink. Ha-ha, this is becoming more than just an electrolyte drink! Big Grin

If that were true then why wouldn't any food containing simple sugars, which is about everything including meats, work?

Could it possibly have something to do with the kind of sugar? They're saying that some sugars, such as honey, maple syrup and black strap molasses, have the ability to bind with turmeric and other anti-cancer substances, whereas simple sugars do not have this ability.

I also found this promising study in which researchers at UCSD and Kyoto University, in successful experiments, "altered glucose or sugar molecules into a form called 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) that cancer cells gobble readily for fuel to grow and multiply, though it cannot be used for energy and hampers growth instead, then primes a trigger for early cell death that a second drug (itself a combination of two cancer-fighting drugs) activates".

http://digitaljournal.com/article/315540

Quote:Another problem I have with that claim is the high iron content of black strap molasses. Free iron in particular can be used to fuel the growth of many microbes including cancer pathogens and can help promote cancer itself. This is why supplements like inositol hexaphosphate (IP6, phytic acid) are used in the treatment of cancers. The phytic acid has a high affinity for free iron and removes it from the system inhibiting cancer pathogens and cancer cells.

Thanks for the heads up on BSM's iron content which can be cancer-promoting. If the Trojan Horse theory holds any merit I will avoid BSM and use honey or maple syrup instead.


RE: Potassium Citrate Dosage - James - 08-26-2013 05:45 AM

(06-06-2013 12:24 PM)mtl777 Wrote:  
Quote:BTW I have heard of a mixture of black strap molasses + ACV + turmeric that was recommended for cancer patients. The black strap molasses, due to its glucose content, was said to act as a Trojan horse to coax the cancer cells into "consuming" the mixture, and then afterwards the turmeric in the mixture kills off the pathogens in the cancer cells. What do you think of this? Maybe I should add black strap molasses and turmeric to the drink. Ha-ha, this is becoming more than just an electrolyte drink! Big Grin

If that were true then why wouldn't any food containing simple sugars, which is about everything including meats, work?

Could it possibly have something to do with the kind of sugar? They're saying that some sugars, such as honey, maple syrup and black strap molasses, have the ability to bind with turmeric and other anti-cancer substances, whereas simple sugars do not have this ability.

I doubt it has anything to do with the type of sugar since many foods either contain or break down in to the same sugars. And the cucuminoids in turmeric are poorly absorbed to begin with.

If these compounds did bind to the turmeric as they claim this would create a larger molecule even harder for the body to assimilate. So I would like to see them provide proof of the binding and absorption first.

As for simple sugars, fructose is a simple sugar and makes up most of honey's sugar composition. So again, it sounds like a lot of hype.