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Cats with potential issues. - ObeyTheSloth - 08-07-2012 04:57 PM

Hi James,

I've recently taken two Scottish Folds into my house. They are both 3 years old.

So far, this is what I've learned about them. From Wikipedia:

The typical lifespan of a Scottish Fold is 15 years.[3]

Scottish folds are susceptible to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)[9] and cardiomyopathy.[10]

Osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) is a developmental abnormality that affects cartilage and bone development throughout the body. This condition causes the fold in the breed and all folded cats are affected by it. [11] Homozygous folds are affected by malformed bone structures and develop severe painful degenerative joint diseases at an early age. This condition also affect heterogyzous folds, but usually to a much lesser extent and at a later age. Some will be asymptomatic.

While ethical breeders breed Fold/non-fold and not Fold/Fold (in the same way Munchkins are bred) to avoid producing homozygous folds,[3] because heterozygous folds can also develop progressive arthritis of varying severity, some researchers recommend abandoning the breeding of folded cats entirely.[12][6] For this reason the breed is not accepted by either the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy[13] or the Fédération Internationale Féline.[14]



I see three potential health issues in the future:

1) Polycystic kidney disease
2) Cardiomyopathy
3) Osteochondrodysplasia
4) Osteoarthritis

Are any of these things treatable, preventable, or can at least their severity be lessened, with cats that have a genetic disposition towards these problems? If so, what is a good protocol? I can do low doses of herbs, since it's much harder force feeding cats (unlike dogs), if I mix some into their food.

Thank you,
Alex.


RE: Cats with potential issues. - James - 08-10-2012 03:53 AM

(08-07-2012 04:57 PM)ObeyTheSloth Wrote:  Hi James,

I've recently taken two Scottish Folds into my house. They are both 3 years old.

So far, this is what I've learned about them. From Wikipedia:

The typical lifespan of a Scottish Fold is 15 years.[3]

Scottish folds are susceptible to polycystic kidney disease (PKD)[9] and cardiomyopathy.[10]

Osteochondrodysplasia (OCD) is a developmental abnormality that affects cartilage and bone development throughout the body. This condition causes the fold in the breed and all folded cats are affected by it. [11] Homozygous folds are affected by malformed bone structures and develop severe painful degenerative joint diseases at an early age. This condition also affect heterogyzous folds, but usually to a much lesser extent and at a later age. Some will be asymptomatic.

While ethical breeders breed Fold/non-fold and not Fold/Fold (in the same way Munchkins are bred) to avoid producing homozygous folds,[3] because heterozygous folds can also develop progressive arthritis of varying severity, some researchers recommend abandoning the breeding of folded cats entirely.[12][6] For this reason the breed is not accepted by either the Governing Council of the Cat Fancy[13] or the Fédération Internationale Féline.[14]



I see three potential health issues in the future:

1) Polycystic kidney disease
2) Cardiomyopathy
3) Osteochondrodysplasia
4) Osteoarthritis

Are any of these things treatable, preventable, or can at least their severity be lessened, with cats that have a genetic disposition towards these problems? If so, what is a good protocol? I can do low doses of herbs, since it's much harder force feeding cats (unlike dogs), if I mix some into their food.

Thank you,
Alex.

I don't know a whole lot about cat health. One thing I do know though is that cats are more prone to kidney disease with an alkaline diet. So they need higher protein to maintain urinary acidity and thus healthy kidneys. Therefore you need to be careful with giving too much plant matter to cats if the plants are too alkaline.

As for the bone and joint issues the diatomaceous earth water, gelatin and vitamin C would be the most beneficial.

Cardiomyopathy is actually a somewhat vague term since it simply means a disorder of the heart muscle. Have you ever ran across anything more specific on cardiomyopathy associated with these cats?



RE: Cats with potential issues. - Whitey - 08-13-2012 11:32 AM

Where is the reply I made here? Did you delete it?

Wikipedia does not test on raw fed cats, I'd bet on it. They use normal commercial fed kibble cats so their results show as mainstream cats fed canned and kibble, which is basically ground up, cooked, fortified, garbage. Foods that are refused by humans and fed to unsuspecting pets. They put a fancy label on it and trick you into thinking it will bring health and long life to your cat or dog. If you feed commercial kibble or canned, expect what you see on Wikipedia. If you feed raw like I do, expect cats with better than average health, much better. The same with over vaccinating cats. Cats are not meant to be eat corn, rice, soy, etc.

If cats eat raw bones, skin and muscle meat, they seem to get all they need. I don't think I'd ever give Vitamin C to a cat. I would give them salt, Silica, or CSilver.

http://rawfedcats.org


RE: Cats with potential issues. - James - 08-16-2012 04:49 AM

(08-13-2012 11:32 AM)Whitey Wrote:  Where is the reply I made here? Did you delete it?

No, I have not deleted any posts. Maybe when you clicked post the post failed.

Wikipedia does not test on raw fed cats, I'd bet on it. They use normal commercial fed kibble cats so their results show as mainstream cats fed canned and kibble, which is basically ground up, cooked, fortified, garbage. Foods that are refused by humans and fed to unsuspecting pets. They put a fancy label on it and trick you into thinking it will bring health and long life to your cat or dog. If you feed commercial kibble or canned, expect what you see on Wikipedia. If you feed raw like I do, expect cats with better than average health, much better. The same with over vaccinating cats. Cats are not meant to be eat corn, rice, soy, etc.

Yes, cats are more carnivores, which helps to maintain the acidic urine they need to keep the kidneys healthy. Again, too alkaline of a diet can cause kidney failure in cats.

If cats eat raw bones, skin and muscle meat, they seem to get all they need. I don't think I'd ever give Vitamin C to a cat. I would give them salt, Silica, or CSilver.

http://rawfedcats.org



RE: Cats with potential issues. - ObeyTheSloth - 08-20-2012 05:40 PM

Whitey, thanks for the advice. I feed them strictly meat. It's rare they get any kind of vegetable matter. You are right that most studies are conducted with typical food, however, it is also a fact that this particular breed is genetically predisposed to such ailments, food or not, and perhaps getting a set of two recessive genes might even lead to bone issues that cannot be reversed through diet alone.

James, I am not really familiar with any of the particulars re: the heart issues, although I've heard of enlargement, congestive heart failure, and blood clots. It seems they are predisposed to heart trouble, in general, perhaps due to weakening of the heart muscle.

Thank you,
Alex.