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How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? - James - 07-28-2012 01:23 AM

How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

http://www.csaceliacs.info/diagnosis_of_celiac_disease.jsp


RE: How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? - vills - 07-28-2012 07:04 PM

(07-28-2012 01:23 AM)James Wrote:  How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

http://www.csaceliacs.info/diagnosis_of_celiac_disease.jsp




So if someone gets Gliadin Iga and tTG in serum tests that are intermittently in ranges from mid normal to high, sign of gluten intolerance only or coeliac? And what is the importance of a a high positive for antibodies (total IgA serum) all the time, is this possible sign of gluten sensitivity, or thyroid or just an autoimmune problem in general?


RE: How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed? - James - 07-30-2012 08:37 PM

(07-28-2012 07:04 PM)vills Wrote:  
(07-28-2012 01:23 AM)James Wrote:  How is Celiac Disease Diagnosed?

http://www.csaceliacs.info/diagnosis_of_celiac_disease.jsp




So if someone gets Gliadin Iga and tTG in serum tests that are intermittently in ranges from mid normal to high, sign of gluten intolerance only or coeliac? And what is the importance of a a high positive for antibodies (total IgA serum) all the time, is this possible sign of gluten sensitivity, or thyroid or just an autoimmune problem in general?

By themselves the antibody tests really mean nothing since antibody tests are notoriously inaccurate. The biggest issue with these tests is a problem known as serological cross reactivity (SCR). In general we are taught that antibodies are specific to their targets, but this is not quite true. The body generates both high affinity (specific) and low affinity (nonspecific) antibodies with varying ranges of specificity. In SCR the nonspecific antibodies cross react on antibody tests yielding false positives.

In autoimmune conditions there is an over abundance of low affinity antibodies increasing SCR and thus increasing false positives.

Therefore, the antibody tests tell us nothing without other lab tests and/or symptoms.