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Raw food - teenee65 - 07-26-2012 11:00 AM

Hi James,

I used to refer to raw fruits and veggies as "alkaline foods" until I found out from you that is wrong! Smile This is probably a silly question but since it isn't the alkalinity factor, what is it about raw foods that are particularly healing? When anyone in our family gets sick, if we go more raw, we seem to spring out of it quickly. My husband asked me to start giving him a raw salad for lunch because it keeps him frosty as opposed to sluggish eating other foods. The "raw-er" I go, the better I seem to feel. Is there a reason for that?

Sorry...this is probably very basic and I have just missed it!!

Thanks James!

Smile


RE: Raw food - James - 07-28-2012 03:38 AM

(07-26-2012 11:00 AM)teenee65 Wrote:  Hi James,

I used to refer to raw fruits and veggies as "alkaline foods" until I found out from you that is wrong! Smile This is probably a silly question but since it isn't the alkalinity factor, what is it about raw foods that are particularly healing? When anyone in our family gets sick, if we go more raw, we seem to spring out of it quickly. My husband asked me to start giving him a raw salad for lunch because it keeps him frosty as opposed to sluggish eating other foods. The "raw-er" I go, the better I seem to feel. Is there a reason for that?

Sorry...this is probably very basic and I have just missed it!!

Thanks James!

Smile

Actually it is not quite than simple. Some raw foods can actually be problematic because they are very goitrogenic is their raw state. For example, broccoli and cabbage. In their raw state these foods suppress thyroid function.

In general though many nutrients are heat sensitive. Therefore, raw foods tend to have higher nutrient levels. Along the same lines cooking some foods, such as beet greens and kale release more of their oxalic acid, which binds some nutrients preventing their absorption.



RE: Raw food - JC73 - 07-28-2012 06:06 AM

I have heard that goitrogenic foods are only a problem for those who don't get enough iodine in their diets and most people can eat all the raw cabbage and broccoli they want without any problems.Which is probably why raw food vegans don't have a problem unless they are also on a low sodium diet.


RE: Raw food - mtl777 - 07-28-2012 02:08 PM

Hi James, could you please give a list of foods (in addition to broccoli and cabbage) that are bad when taken raw? Also foods that are good when taken raw.

Thanks!


RE: Raw food - James - 07-30-2012 11:05 PM

(07-28-2012 06:06 AM)JC73 Wrote:  I have heard that goitrogenic foods are only a problem for those who don't get enough iodine in their diets and most people can eat all the raw cabbage and broccoli they want without any problems.Which is probably why raw food vegans don't have a problem unless they are also on a low sodium diet.

Yes, iodine can counter goitrogens. This is why I encourage people to consume seaweeds with raw food diets.



RE: Raw food - James - 07-30-2012 11:56 PM

(07-28-2012 02:08 PM)mtl777 Wrote:  Hi James, could you please give a list of foods (in addition to broccoli and cabbage) that are bad when taken raw? Also foods that are good when taken raw.

Thanks!

Here is part of an old post I wrote on the subject:

"Virtually any plant we eat technically can be considered goitrogenic since virtually every plant we eat contains compounds that can suppress the thyroid such as phytoestrogens. But many of these plants also contain other compounds that also support the thyroid. For example, seaweeds contain phytoestrogens that have a weak goitrogenic effect, but they also contain iodine that counters the goitrogenic effect."

There are other factors that also have to be considered in determining the goitrogenic activity of foods other than their goitrogens versus iodine content.

For example, if the food is raw or cooked since cooking reduces goitrogens. Although in this case we are going with raw foods. So the other factor that could affect the goitrogenic activity is whether the food is fermented or not since fermentation also reduces goitrogens. Therefore, sauerkraut would have less of a goitrogenic effect than coleslaw even though both are made from raw cabbage. Here are some links from old posts I did on goitrogens:


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogen

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=47

http://cupidvalentino.blogspot.com/2006_06_01_archive.html



RE: Raw food - mtl777 - 08-01-2012 01:01 AM

Thanks James, good info! So you also wrote for wiki and whfoods?

I think one other issue with raw veges is vitamin K. Too much of it and you'll get blood clots. I had a cousin who died from pulmonary embolism. She had cancer of the spine which metastasized from breast cancer. The tumor hit something in her spine that caused paralysis of half of her body from the waste down. She followed a strict vegetarian diet in an attempt to beat the cancer. But being bedridden and unable to exercise, circulation was compromised and her body atrophied. That, coupled with too much vitamin K which caused blood clots, led to pulmonary embolism.


RE: Raw food - James - 08-01-2012 07:14 PM

(08-01-2012 01:01 AM)mtl777 Wrote:  Thanks James, good info! So you also wrote for wiki and whfoods?

No, those are not my writings.

I think one other issue with raw veges is vitamin K. Too much of it and you'll get blood clots.

Not necessarily. Plants often contain blood thinners as well such as omega 3s, salicylates and coumarins.

I had a cousin who died from pulmonary embolism. She had cancer of the spine which metastasized from breast cancer. The tumor hit something in her spine that caused paralysis of half of her body from the waste down. She followed a strict vegetarian diet in an attempt to beat the cancer. But being bedridden and unable to exercise, circulation was compromised and her body atrophied. That, coupled with too much vitamin K which caused blood clots, led to pulmonary embolism.

Inactivity itself is a big factor in the production of blood clots. It is also possible that she injured herself leading to blood clots or they formed as part of one of the procedures she had for her cancer.



RE: Raw food - mtl777 - 08-04-2012 03:37 PM

Quote:I think one other issue with raw veges is vitamin K. Too much of it and you'll get blood clots.

Not necessarily. Plants often contain blood thinners as well such as omega 3s, salicylates and coumarins.

So it's not true that veges high in vitamin K can cause blood clots? Or are you just saying that some veges high in vitamin K also contain blood thinners, and so, are safe to eat even in large quantities continuously? If so, what veges are safe to eat a lot of on a daily basis?

Thanks!


RE: Raw food - James - 08-06-2012 06:17 AM

(08-04-2012 03:37 PM)mtl777 Wrote:  
Quote:I think one other issue with raw veges is vitamin K. Too much of it and you'll get blood clots.

Not necessarily. Plants often contain blood thinners as well such as omega 3s, salicylates and coumarins.

So it's not true that veges high in vitamin K can cause blood clots?

Not really. Calcium is actually essential to blood clotting as well, but taking extra calcium is not going to cause blood clots either.

Injuries and stagnation of the blood are the big factors to blood clotting.

And again, most foods that naturally contain vitamin K will also contain natural blood thinners.


Or are you just saying that some veges high in vitamin K also contain blood thinners, and so, are safe to eat even in large quantities continuously?

In general yes. High vitamin K foods are not recommended in cases where people are on pharmaceutical blood thinners, particularly Coumadin (Warfarin) since vitamin K is an antagonist.

But this does not necessarily mean that easting large amounts of green leafy vegetables is good. Many greens also contain a high amount of oxalic acid, which is not good in large amounts. For example, kale and beet greens.


If so, what veges are safe to eat a lot of on a daily basis?

Thanks!

This kind of depends on the person. What is safe for one person may not be right for someone else. For example, many vegetables contain salicylates that some people have sensitivities to. Diabetics should limit high glycemic vegetables. Women who are pregnant should avoid large amounts of carrots since they can stimulate uterine contractions.........

A varied diet with a variety of vegetables and other foods is going to best. And of course people should avoid foods that they have sensitivities to or other problems with.



RE: Raw food - mtl777 - 08-06-2012 03:10 PM

Thank you for this great info! Once again you have "demythified" something that I thought was true, and I'm glad it isn't true. Smile